From 'bodyline' to the Oval 'forfeit' - Six of the biggest scandals to rock the cricket world

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Inzamam-ul-Haq's Pakistan refused to take the field at the Oval in 2006.

Bodyline, underarm bowling, match fixing and more. Australia‘s ball-tampering woes are the latest in a long line of scandals to have hit the world of cricket.

Here’s a looks at six of the biggest scandals in cricket.

ENGLAND’S ‘BODYLINE’ SERIES

England‘s 1932/3 tour of Australia was notable for skipper Douglas Jardine’s tactic of ‘fast leg theory bowling’. Bowlers pitched short balls on leg stump that reared into the body of where an orthodox batsman would be standing after taking his guard. With fast bowler Harold Larwood to the fore, the “bodyline” plan was employed in a bid to dent the dominance of the brilliant Don Bradman through physical intimidation.

But it led to a diplomatic incident between the two countries over allegations of unsporting tactic. Either way it worked, with England winning the Ashes 4-1, but such was the uproar, Nottinghamshire miner Larwood never played another Test in a bitter and premature end to his international career.

Dougals Jardine devised the notorious tactic.

Dougals Jardine devised the notorious tactic.

HANSIE CRONJE’S MATCH FIXING

Late South African captain Hansie Cronje was banned for life after he admitted fixing his own team’s one-day internationals against India in 2000. Cronje, who died aged 32 in a plane crash in 2002, had initially denied all allegations of wrong-doing, but eventually came clean after mounting evidence that included former teammates testifying that they had received cash offers from the Proteas skipper to throw matches.

Cronje was handed a life-ban following the inquiry.

Cronje was handed a life-ban following the inquiry.

SALIM MALIK’S MATCH FIXING

Pakistan skipper Salim Malik also picked up a life ban in 2000 on the recommendation of the Qayyum enquiry into match fixing in the 1990s that rocked Pakistan. Ex-captain Rashid Latif was the first cricketer to accuse Malik of match-fixing during Pakistan’s tour to South Africa and Zimbabwe in 1995.

Malik's scandal rocked Pakistan cricket.

Malik’s scandal rocked Pakistan cricket.

TREVOR CHAPPELL’S UNDERAM BALL

Trevor Chappell was vilified after one of the most notorious unsporting acts of all time — bowling underarm on the final ball of an ODI to help Australia beat New Zealand in Melbourne in 1981.

It won them the match, but lost him all respect, despite Chappell acting on the orders of his older brother and then captain, Greg. Chappell said he had been seen as the most despised man in Australian cricket until the latest scandal involving current skipper Steve Smith.

Greg Chappel had asked his younger sibling to bowl the underarm ball.

Greg Chappel had asked his younger sibling to bowl the underarm ball.

PAKISTANI SPOT FIXING

Salman Butt was captain of Pakistan when fast bowlers Mohammad Asif and Mohammad Amir delivered deliberate no-balls during a Test match against England at Lord’s in August 2010. The trio admitted to working with a bookmaker and served time in prison in England before being suspended for a minimum five years by the International cricket Council. The ban ended on September 1, 2015.

The trio served time in prison in England for their offence.

The trio served time in prison in England for their offence.

PAKISTAN FORFEIT ENGLAND TEST

Maybe the most infamous ball-tampering controversy in recent memory ended with Pakistan forfeiting their Test against England at The Oval in 2006. Umpires Darrell Hair and Billy Doctrove gave England five penalty runs after ruling that Pakistan had tampered with the ball, leaving the tourists incensed.

Inzamam ul-Haq’s side refused to take the field after the tea break in protest, and the umpires awarded the match to England, the first forfeiture in Test history. Pakistan were later cleared of ball-tampering by the ICC, with the governing body also controversially changing the result of the match to a draw.

Pakistan and Inzamam were later cleared by the ICC.

Pakistan and Inzamam were later cleared by the ICC.

Provided by AFP Sport

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Former England pacer Bob Willis believes Virat Kohli should not be allowed to play county cricket

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Kohli is set for his maiden stint in England's domestic circuit.

Virat Kohli is set to make his maiden bow in the English County circuit this summer but it that fact has not gone down too well with former England pacer Bob Willis.

Kohli is reportedly set to play for Surrey after completing his engagements in the upcoming IPL in a bid to sharpen his game ahead of India’s tour of England starting July.

Willis, who played 90 Tests and 64 ODIs for England, believes the India skipper should not be allowed to utilise the county stint to better prepare himself for the Test series.

In five Test matches so far in England, Kohli has only managed to score 134 runs at an average of 13.40.

“I can’t stand overseas players in county cricket,” said Willis who was quoted as saying by Sky Sports.

“It doesn’t benefit the players stranded in the second XI year on year and the youngsters. The only way to improve our Test team is to have as many England-qualified players playing in the County Championship as possible. Instead, they’re going to pay Kohli, presumably, five figures a match so he can hone his skills in English conditions before a Test series. It’s a nonsense,” he added.

Willis (R) wants Kohli to suffer the same fate as previous tours of England.

Willis (r) wants Kohli to suffer the same fate as previous tours of England.

The outspoken pacer added that Kohli should be made to ‘suffer’ like he has done on previous tours of the country.

“He should be made to suffer and average 30 in England as he has done before. We don’t want England starting to lose Test matches at home because we’re accommodating all of these visiting players,” Willis said.

India are set to tour England for five Tests, three ODIs and as many T20Is between July and September. Kohli, who will become the first Indian to play for Surrey should he sign with them, has been given permission from the BCCI to miss the one-off Test against Afghanistan in June.

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Former South Africa bowler Fanie de Villiers responsible for tipping off cameraman in Newlands ball-tampering scandal

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The former Proteas player's initial suspicion was found to be accurate.

Twenty-four years ago Fanie de Villiers dismantled an Australian cricket team with a sensational spell of swing bowling. Now he has emerged as one of the key figures in exposing the current Australian side as ball tamperers.

In January 1994, an inexperienced South African team, on their first tour of Australia after two decades of political isolation, faced almost certain defeat when Australia needed just 116 runs to win the second Test in Sydney.

Playing in just his second Test, De Villiers took six for 43 and bowled South Africa to an improbable five-run victory in a match in which they had been forced to follow on and in which Shane Warne had taken 12 wickets for Australia.

Twenty-four years later De Villiers was at Newlands as a television commentator, trying to understand how the Australians were able to get reverse swing on a grassy field with a ball which was still relatively new.

De Villiers told Australian radio station RSN927 that he had tipped off the camera crew that caught Cameron Bancroft rubbing the ball with a piece of yellow tape which the batsman then tried to conceal.

“We actually said to our cameramen: ‘Go out. Have a look, boys. They are using something.’ It’s impossible for the ball to get altered like that on a cricket wicket where we knew there is a grass covering on. It’s not a Pakistani wicket where there are cracks every centimetre.

“I said earlier that if they could get reverse swing in the 26th, 27th, 28th over, then they are doing something different from what everyone else does.”

According to De Villiers, it took the cameramen an hour and a half of searching before they caught Bancroft in the act.

Bancroft admitted he panicked when he saw close-up images of himself on the big screen, leading him to try to conceal the tape in his underwear, an image shown around the cricketing world and reproduced on websites and numerous newspapers.

“I was nervous about it because with hundreds of cameras around that’s always the risk,” Bancroft said when he admitted to using the tape to rub against the ball.

It was only a slight exaggeration. SuperSport television producer Alvin Naicker said that 30 cameras were at the ground, with seven instructed to follow the ball at all times, even when it was out of play.

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