Asian Cup 2019: Flawless Mehdi Taremi is our Hero of the Day

Matt Jones 8/01/2019
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • Mail
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • WhatsApp
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn
Sardor Azmoun congratulates Mehdi Taremi after scoring one of his two goals against Yemen.

Iran laid down a marker to claim a record-equaling fourth Asian Cup title with a 5-0 romp against debutants Yemen.

Three goals in 13 first half minutes sent them on their way in Abu Dhabi, with Mehdi Taremi bagging a brace and Ashkan Dejagah making it 3-0. Sardar Azmoun and Saman Ghoddos sealed the win in the second half.

Here we take a closer look at the performance of livewire forward Taremi, who was absolutely dazzling for Team Melli.

30-SECOND REPORT

Minnows Yemen threatened to cause un upset early on as they took the game to their more illustrious opponents in the opening stages. But once Iran found their feet they moved through the gears effortlessly, with Taremi showing persistence and poise when he was on hand to tap in the opener, before glancing in a fine header to almost seal the points. He then teed up Azmoun to round off a perfect individual night.

07 01 mehdi taremi

GOT RIGHT

Predatory instincts: Playing from the left of four-man attacking midfield, the dynamic Al Gharafa forward was able to drift into the centre and utilise his height and goalscoring knack. As lone front man Azmoun’s snapshot was spilled by the goalkeeper the 26-year-old reacted sharply and was on hand to snaffle up a golden chance and sidefoot his side ahead.

As Iran cut loose thereafter, Taremi sealed the three points with a third Iran goal in 13 minutes, rising sublimely to nod in a perfect Ramin Rezaeian cross into the corner to give the keeper no chance whatsoever.

GOT WRONG

Ball retention: Hard to criticise a man who enjoyed such an all-round superb display, but if we’re being supremely picky, he could have kept hold of the ball a bit better. When he had it, he was devastating, as his two goals, assist and passing accuracy confirm, but he did lose the ball 12 times.

He made five recoveries having lost possession, so even when he did lose it he must be given credit for tirelessly chasing down opposition players. It feels very wrong to fling any criticism his way though, he had a stellar night.

VERDICT 9/10

With players like Taremi in the ranks, it’s easy to see why Iran are such a dangerous opponent going forward. Carlos Queiroz has an abundance of attacking talent at his disposal, so much so that Brighton forward Alireza Jahanbakhsh, who was topscorer in the Netherlands last season, was left on the bench kicking his heels.

And with Taremi in this sort of form, that’s where he might stay too, because there’s no way he won’t be the first name on the teamsheet for the Vietnam match.

Most popular

Asian Cup 2019: Free-flowing Iran entertain and other talking points in big win over Yemen

Matt Jones 7/01/2019
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • Mail
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • WhatsApp
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn
Sardar Azmoun scored his 26th goals in his 42nd appearance for Iran.

Iran laid down a marker to claim a record-equalling fourth Asian Cup title with a 5-0 romp against debutants Yemen.

Three goals in 13 first-half minutes sent them on their way in Abu Dhabi, with Mehdi Taremi bagging a brace and Ashkan Dejagah making it 3-0. Sardar Azmoun and Saman Ghoddos sealed the win in the second half.

Here we take a look at three of the game’s talking points.

ARE WE LOOKING AT THE CHAMPIONS?

Iran

This was by far the best performance in the tournament so far. OK, so we’re only seven games in and a comfortable victory was only secured after minnows Yemen enjoyed an impressive start.

But once Iran found their feet they moved through the gears effortlessly. They of course have pedigree in this tournament, they are three-time winners (joint second most titles along with Saudi Arabia).

They are the highest-ranked Asian team in the FIFA standings and their position at 29th is the highest they have ascended since 2001 and the heyday of Ali Daei.

Their standing is well earned and has been honed during eight years under the tutelage of former Real Madrid and Portugal head coach Carlos Queiroz. Under the 65-year-old they have risen 37 places from 66th and been steadily on the rise in recent years.

Since the 2014 World Cup Queiroz’s Iran have only tasted defeat six times in 54 games, triumphant on 37 occasions. They are battle-hardened and have matchwinners in abundance.

FROM GROUP OF DEATH TO DEVASTATING

Ashkan Dejagah celebrates his goal.

Ashkan Dejagah celebrates his goal.

This is the Iran we all wanted to see at the World Cup. They will curse the fact they found themselves pitted in the Group of Death alongside powerhouses Spain and Portugal, as well as African heavyweights Morocco, which left a star-studded, exciting team with a near impossible task of making the knockout stages.

They were forced to adopt a more workmanlike, defensive, disruptive approach in order to counteract the threats of Cristiano Ronaldo, Diego Costa and Co, rather than showcase their attacking talent. Their only defeat was a 1-0 reversal at the hands of La Roja.

That attacking threat was abundantly clear in this swashbuckling victory. Livewire forwards Taremi and Azmoun (he of 26 goals in just 42 caps) ran riot, while former Fulham and Wolfsburg winger Dejagah, Mehdi Torabi and Vahid Amiri constantly probed.

They didn’t even have to summon Brighton bombshell Alireza Jahanbakhsh – the 25-year-old winger who laid waste to the Eredevisie last season with a league-leading 21 goals and joint third most assists (12) – from the bench. The opposition may have been tame, but this was far more like it.

YEMEN HOLD HEADS HIGH

Yemen started brightly in Abu Dhabi.

Yemen started brightly in Abu Dhabi.

At first glance it appears as if Iran’s 5-0 win was a mauling of the minnows. It was, but that does not tell the full story.

Yemen made their Asian Cup debut on Monday yet for an initial 10-minute period at Al Jazira’s Mohammed Bin Zayed Stadium, they looked like seasoned veterans, taking the game to more illustrious and established opponents. Had it not been for goalkeeper Saoud Al Sowadi’s foam fingers, Iran might have toiled much longer for an opening goal.

And while Iran eventually showed their undoubted class, Jan Kocian’s Yemen can hold their heads high.

Then North Yemen, they made their bow in world football at the 1965 Pan Arab Games in Egypt. Three years later Iran would embark on a 12-year reign of dominance across Asia as they won the first of three unprecedented straight Asian Cup titles.

The country has far more problems to prioritise than football at the moment. But against one of the favourites, they did not disgrace themselves.

Most popular

Asian Cup 2019: Saudi Arabia's Green Falcons need to take flight against North Korea

Matt Jones 7/01/2019
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • Mail
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • WhatsApp
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn

Two teams at opposite ends of the spectrum in terms of Asian Cup royalty meet in Dubai on Tuesday, as three-time winners Saudi Arabia take on North Korea, who finished fourth in 1980.

The Saudis are coming into the tournament on the back of a disappointing 2018 World Cup, while a youthful-looking Korean side appointed a 35-year-old new manager just last month.

Here, we look ahead to the game.

TALKING POINT

Can Saudi recover their reputation?

Juan Antonio Pizzi has work to do to restore faith in Saudi football after a woeful World Cup.

Juan Antonio Pizzi has work to do to restore faith in Saudi football after a woeful World Cup.

Heavyweights of Asia, there can be no doubt, but the Green Falcons are coming into the Asian Cup with their wings certainly clipped following a group stage exit at last summer’s World Cup.

Saudi are the joint-second most-successful nation at Asian Cups, having lifted three crowns, and they will have fond memories of the UAE, having hoisted their last title in the Emirates 23 years ago.

They are one of the favourites for the trophy and are the fourth highest ranked Asian nation in FIFA (69th, Iran are 29th, Japan 50th and South Korea 53rd).

Yet, there is can be no doubt Juan Antonio Pizzi’s men have something to prove. They left Russia with a morale-boosting 2-1 win over Mohamed Salah’s Egypt, but the 5-0 pummelling on opening night by the hosts will still be ringing in their ears.

Results since that fine victory over the Pharaohs have been decent, one defeat to the mighty Brazil punctuating an otherwise unbeaten five-game run. Stalwarts Osama Hawsawi and Taisir Al Jassim (138 and 134 caps respectively) have gone, ushering in a new era. Fahad Al Muwallad, who spent time on loan at La Liga’s Levante last season, leads the new wave. And they will know reputation needs to be restored.

Giving youth a chance

Naming former players as coaches is nothing new – but not many get the top job aged just 35.

Former Norway striker Jorn Andersen declined to extend his two-year contract with Chollima just last month, resulting in national team selectors turning to a tenacious former midfielder who helped his nation qualify for just a second-ever World Cup in 2010 – Kim Yong-jun.

Despite his youthful years, Kim is no stranger to management, having taken charge of Pyongyang City, where he started his playing career, as long ago as 2010.

After leaving the post in 2013 he spent the next four years rising through the national ranks, acting as assistant of the under-16s, 17s and U-23 North Korea teams, although his selection to lead his country into the Asian Cup will have raised some eyebrows.

He has selected a young squad for the continental competition – only goalkeeper and captain Ri Myong-guk and defender Kim Song-gi are above 30.

Kim will be hoping for a better result from the last meeting between the two sides in the competition, when Saudi mauled Korea 4-1 in Melbourne in 2015.

QUOTES

Saudi Arabia

Pizzi feels the Green Falcons’ rich history at the tournament will count for nothing in their opening clash with Korea.

“Previous results in this competition aren’t something we can depend on in tomorrow’s game,” said the 50-year-old, who won the Copa America with Chile in 2016. “I think history doesn’t count in this situation because you have to prove you are better than the opponent.”

North Korea

The Koreans have not won a match at the Asian Cup since 1980 and boss Kim is expecting that to change in the UAE.

“Of course I am expecting us to have a better result than in our tournament history and I have told the players that every player has to be together and play with team spirit for all 90 minutes,” he said. “Everyone has to do their job.”

PLAYER TO WATCH

Saudi Arabia

Abdulrahman Ghareeb

Saudi have been blessed with wiry, wafer-thin wizards in recent years, and 21-year-old Ghareeb looks like he could be the latest off the production line. With the likes of Fahad Al Muwallad, Yahya Al Shehri and Salem Al Dawsari pulling the attacking strings, watch out for the Al Ahli Jeddah product should he get his chance.

The 5ft 5in forward has three goals in 13 games for Ahli this season and already has a goal at senior international level after earning five caps, having been rushed through the youth ranks.

North Korea

Han Kwang-son

Plenty of South Koreans have starred in European football, but stars from the north are few and far between. That might be about to change with 20-year-old forward Han, who joined Serie A side Cagliari’s academy in 2015 and has made a handful of league appearances while spending the last two seasons on loan at Perugia in the league below.

His agent Sandro Stemperini revealed in October that Italian behemoths Juventus allegedly tried to sign him last January. With just two caps to his name, can Han become an Asian Cup hero?

Most popular