Saudi Professional League talking points as Al Hilal and Al Nassr await grandstand title finale

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(Twitter/@Alhilal_FC).

The title showdown between Riyadh giants headlines a Saudi Professional League decider laced with interest throughout the division.

After 296 matches across eight months, much remains up for grabs. A solitary point separates leaders Al Nassr – gunning for a first top-flight success since 2014/15 – and holders Al Hilal. This battle, in turn, will have a strong bearing on the race for the remaining 2020 AFC Champions League berth between third-placed Al Shabab, resurgent King’s Cup winners Al Taawoun and managerless Al Ahli Jeddah.

Further down, fallen giants Al Ittihad are, finally, safe from the dreaded drop. Only one of Al Qadsiah, Al Fayha and Al Hazem are guaranteed to feel the same way when the final whistle is blown.

THE KINGDOM’S CROWN

The hard work is done by Nassr, all that’s left is to creep over the line.

For neighbours Hilal, the time has come to pray for an unexpected gift. The contrast in last opponents could not be starker.

Nassr welcome relegated Batin, who they swatted aside 2-0 in October. They have also lost seven of their last eight matches.

Some momentum has been found by Hilal under coach Pericles Chamusca, their third of the campaign. Charged-up Shabab, however, must triumph at King Saud University Stadium to guarantee ACL football for the first time since 2015.

There have been several twists in this tale. Can we expect another?

TAAWOUN’S JUST REWARD?

A dream 2018/19 could yet leave a sour taste for Taawoun.

Little was expected from 2017/18’s seventh-placed club. Under unheralded Al Ain target Pedro Emanuel, however, they have ended a 10-year trophy drought and are close to a second-ever ACL entry.

Taawoun must now swat aside Al Faisaly and hope Hilal down Shabab. If not, last week’s frustrating goalless draw against the aforementioned side will linger throughout the long summer hiatus.

TIGERS CLAW WAY BACK

Disaster has been averted by Ittihad.

There is, however, something still to play for. Jose Luis Sierra’s answering of February’s emergency call sparked a staggering revival that has, thus far, encompassed six wins, one draw and one loss to snatch SPL survival.

A final flourish against bottom-placed Ohod will help show which players deserve to be retained for 2019/20’s climb up the standings.

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Saudi Professional League: Title twist for Al Nassr and Al Hilal, relegation dogfight to heat up

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The Saudi Professional League is braced for consequential clashes at both ends of the table in this weekend’s penultimate round.

Holders Al Hilal’s shock 2-0 reversal against Al Taawoun last Monday ceded control to Riyadh neighbours Al Nassr in the bitter race for the top-flight crown. Both contenders face welcome clashes against lowly opposition, although another slip from the Crescent should be terminal to hopes of success.

At the bottom, 15th-placed Al Batin’s fate may be sealed when they meet relegated Ohod. Setbacks for Al Qadsiah and Al Fayha will make next week’s final day a nervy affair.

Here are the talking points:

STILL TIME FOR A TWIST?

Hilal supporters will be paying peculiar attention to Al Hazem’s fortunes this Friday.

The SPL’s fifth-worst side may hold the key to the addition of a record-extending 16th title. They welcome Nassr to Al Hazem Club Stadium – and this is no dead rubber for the hosts.

An uncomfortable advantage of two points separates them from Al Fayha, who reside in the relegation play-off position. With their opponents off to play mid-table Al Raed, a valuable victory to catapult them to safety cannot be discounted.

Recent history, however, should leave the Hilal faithful – and temporary boss Pericles Chamusca – unsettled.

In October’s previous meeting, a brace from Brazil creator Giuliano helped earn a dominant 5-1 triumph.

The same player was also at his inspirational best on Tuesday, notching a goal and assist, when progression to the 2019 AFC Champions League’s round of 16 was earned with a 3-1 beating of Al Wasl.

Hilal play Ettifaq a day later, repeating one of this season’s most-electrifying clashes.

In a King’s Cup quarter-final for the ages, the exalted visitors from Riyadh twice went behind prior to a towering header deep into second-half injury time from Saudi Arabia centre-back Mohammed Jahfali that earned extra time.

Peru winger Andre Carillo was then alert in the 105th minute to salvage the day – little good that it ultimately did thanks to the historic 5-0 humiliation to Taawoun in the semis.

Both title chasers should triumph in the coming days. But a seventh – and potentially decisive – change of the lead cannot be discounted, either.

Intrigue and entertainment awaits.

THE DOGFIGHT

Hope could prove ephemeral for Batin.

Last month’s snapping of a five-match losing streak at fellow strugglers Qadsiah has provided the slimmest of hopes. They have to double up against Ohod – something they’ve failed to do since January – to stand any chance of survival.

Qadsiah face a seventh-placed Wehda who’ve clocked off for the season early, after two-successive losses. Fayha will fancy their chances versus Raed and Hazem will surely be downed by Nassr.

This then leaves Al Ittihad. The fallen giant rebounded forcefully from King’s Cup final defeat to beat Qatar’s Al Rayyan in midweek, making it seven triumphs from their last nine matches in all competitions.

Defeat Al Fateh and the ‘Great Escape’ is all-but-done by Jose Luis Sierra.

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AFC Champions League exit could lead to Asia exile for Al Ain and other talking points from defeat to Al Hilal

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Hattan Bahebri put Al Hilal ahead after just 15 seconds.

Al Ain exited the AFC Champions League in timid fashion, a third defeat in five Group C games rendering their 2019 campaign over.

With no wins and just two points to show for their efforts, their run has reflected their woes this season – they simply haven’t been good enough.

In an opening that was indicative of how rapidly Al Ain’s season has unravelled, they were behind after just 15 seconds. Carlos Eduardo sliced through white shirts at will and even when he was brought down, Hattan Bahebri had the speed of thought to keep the move going, turning the last man and rifling beyond Khalid Essa.

Rather than surrender and wave the white flag though, the team in white shirts fought valiantly. And it was only through Mohammad Al Shalhoub’s late counter-attacking goal that Hilal added a gloss to a 2-0 scoreline.

Here are the game’s talking points.

OUT IN THE COLD?

And so, Al Ain depart the Champions League. Sneaking out in embarrassment rather than their heroic 2016 exit when they were beaten 3-2 in the final, a missed second leg penalty away from taking South Korea’s Jeonbuk Hyundai Motors to extra-time.

And their timid 2019 group stage exit, coupled with a woeful domestic campaign, begs the question: how long could it be before they grace the competition once more?

The Boss are in real danger of failing to qualify for 2020’s edition following a rancid run of results in the Arabian Gulf League. A stretch of five games without a win has seen them slip not only out of the title picture in the UAE, but also the continental one too.

Their wretched run – they have one win in 11 games in all competitions – has seen them slip to fourth, 13 points adrift of champions elect Sharjah.

With 40 points they sit one point and one place behind Al Jazira, who are third, while rising Al Wahda share their tally and are have won three straight – including victories over Asia-chasing Jazira and Shabab Al Ahli Dubai Club.

Their domestic crown is gone. And they may no longer be Asian royalty either from next season, which would be the first time in eight years they would have failed to qualify for the Champions League.

The last time the ACL did not feature the men from the Garden City was 2012. This is the first time since 2013 they have failed to emerge from the group stage.

They are the only side from the Emirates to lift the continental crown and one of only two to feature in the final. But with the club in free-fall this term and domestic rivals getting stronger, fans must be fearful. The decline is real.

HILAL HIT BACK

Mohammad Al Shalhoub celebrates his winning goal for Al Hilal in the reverse game.

Mohammad Al Shalhoub celebrates his winning goal for Al Hilal in the reverse game.

How do you respond to a horrendous patch of form that has seen you exit the one competition via a humiliating 5-0 defeat, lose ground in the league title race and lose your manager?

Well, scoring after 15 seconds should go some way to making amends.

After appearing imperious and on course for a glut of silverware a month ago, a tumultuous April had turned things upside down for the Saudi Arabia giants. A hammering at the hands of Al Taawoun in the King’s Cup semi-finals was humiliating, adding to their 2-1 defeat at the hands of Tunisia’s Etoile du Sahel in the Zayed Champions Cup.

A second defeat in three days to the same opponents – this time in the Saudi Pro League – resulted in a relinquishing of first place to fierce Riyadh rivals Al Nassr, who now lead the table by a point with two games remaining.

In the midst of such a demoralising run, coach Zoran Mamic was fired – a complete reversal in fortunes for the Croatian, who would surely have been planning to welcome his former side to Riyadh for the return leg, having overseen a 1-0 win at the Hazza Bin Zayed Stadium at the beginning of March.

Instead, the much-travelled Pericles Chamusca is now in control of the Crescent, and he will have at least appeased his employers by guiding the continental giants into the knockout stages of this year’s competition.

Sterner tests than a rapidly declining Al Ain lie ahead in the business end of the competition. But at least one west Asian powerhouse will be there.

LIGHT AMID THE DARKNESS

Mohammed Khalfan has emerged as a fine prospect for Al Ain.

Mohammed Khalfan has emerged as a fine prospect for Al Ain.

In what’s been a woeful campaign for his club, Mohammed Khalfan has really emerged in recent months as a bright prospect for Al Ain.

After being carved open in the opening seconds by Eduardo’s brilliance, Al Ain could easily have capitulated after going a goal down. They needed their experienced players to come to the fore if a humiliation was going to be avoided – with veteran midfielders Tongo Doumbia, Amer Abdulrahman and Ahmed Barman answering the call.

They were calm and composed and snapped into challenges, not allowing the hosts the time required to build their free-flowing attacks.

Although the experienced trio got to grips with Hilal’s potent players, Khalfan also really rose to the occasion.

The 20-year-old showed a calmness and maturity beyond his youthful years. He was energetic, combative and made intelligent runs throughout the contest and didn’t go hiding or shirk his defensive responsibilities.

He was fearless and flowed forward with attacking intent, confident on the ball and making intelligent runs in order to open up space for Abdulrahman and Barman to exploit, and with the ball at his feet he provided a threat to the hosts.

An incisive run into the heart of the Hilal defence could even have earned his side a penalty, while he shanked a late shot into the grateful grasp of Abdullah Al Maiouf.

It’s been a troublesome campaign for the Boss and there are testing times ahead. But the lively Khalfan has been a shining light amid dim times.

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