Abu Dhabi GP review: When Vettel became the youngest world champion in history

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Sebastian Vettel won the 2010 Abu Dhabi GP and the world title.

It was the year of the Big Five. It was the 60th anniversary of the Formula One world championship. And it was one of the greatest seasons in the sport’s history.

Proof of that statement? Arriving for the 19th and last race of the year, no fewer than four drivers were still in the hunt for the world title. Mark Webber and Sebastian Vettel were two of them, their combined efforts having already clinched the constructors’ championship for their team. The others were McLaren’s Lewis Hamilton, the 2008 title-winner, and Fernando Alonso, who had switched from Renault to Ferrari after a disappointing 2009.

The season saw the points on offer increase to 25 for the winner, rewarding the top 10 on a scale of 25-18-15-12-10-8-6-4-2-1, which meant Alonso arrived in the lead on 246 points from Webber on 238, Vettel on 231 and Hamilton on 222.

Defending champion Jenson Button, fifth of the ‘Big Five’ and now at McLaren, had slipped out of contention on 199. Youngest of the quartet, Vettel also positioned himself as the outsider: “The target is clear,” said the German. “The speed has been there all season and it hasn’t been the easiest season for myself. But we are still in the hunt, so that is good. We try our best. The clear favourites going into this weekend are Mark and Fernando. I try to do my best race and then it depends on where those two guys are.”

Neither ‘those two guys’ nor Hamilton could prevent Vettel from taking his first Abu Dhabi pole and his 10th of the year with a time of 1:39.394, as the main stars filled the top five grid spots, Hamilton alongside Vettel on the front row, Alonso and Button behind, and Webber beside Alonso’s Ferrari teammate Felipe Massa on row three.

Vettel at the Yas Marina Circuit.

Vettel at the Yas Marina Circuit.

If Vettel was the youngest man in the title hunt, the oldest man in the field was one who had served both as inspiration and as target for the German. His compatriot Michael Schumacher, seven-time world champion, winner of 91 Grands Prix, out of the sport since 2006, had been coaxed out of retirement by Mercedes when they took over 2009 title-winners Brawn.

And it was Michael who stood out when the race got under way, for all the wrong reasons: spinning at the chicane first time round, Schumacher was about to get going again when Tonio Liuzzi’s Force India arrived.

With nowhere to go, the Italian’s car mounted the front of the Mercedes, its front left wheel stopping thankfully short of Michael’s helmet. As the dust settled, Vettel the outsider was out in front, and the ‘two other guys’, Alonso and Webber, were in trouble.

The Australian could not extract the maximum from his Bridgestone tyres and pitted after 11 laps. Ferrari reacted belatedly, deciding to cover Webber by bringing Alonso in four laps later. They both found themselves behind Vitaly Petrov’s Renault – and their chances evaporated as they remained stuck in the Russian’s wake for 40 agonising laps while Vettel and Hamilton cruised home first and second ahead of Button.

Vettel garnered 25 points to Alonso’s six and Webber’s four; he led the world championship for the first time as he crossed the Yas Marina finishing line; and he became F1’s youngest world champion at the age of 23 years and 134 days.

“I don’t know what to say but doubtless I’ll find a reason to talk forever,” said the notoriously verbose Vettel, who had ended the campaign brilliantly with victories in Brazil and Abu Dhabi to overhaul his more seasoned rivals, finishing on 256 points to Alonso’s 252 and Webber’s 240.

Five wins, 10 poles, three fastest laps and five other podiums were the bare bones of a remarkable year both for him and for his sport. Looking forward to a night of celebration, the young champion said” “The race started in daylight and I think in a way it will also finish in daylight.”

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Abu Dhabi Grand Prix: A look back the first race ahead of 10th edition

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Sebastian Vettel won the first Abu Dhabi Grand Prix.

“We want to finish the season in style with a great result, but we can be a little more relaxed in our approach to the weekend – and of course, it’s always fun to try a new track.”

Jenson Button summed it up beautifully.

He and his Brawn Mercedes team – the phoenix rising from ashes of Honda’s failed F1 return – were embarking on the first Abu Dhabi Grand Prix weekend just 11 days after securing the Drivers’ World Championship in Brazil, so no wonder the 29-year-old Englishman was in easy-going mode.

But drivers are competitive animals, and there was something at stake: the honour of being the first man to take victory on the UAE’s brand-new Yas Marina Circuit, whose state-of-the-art facilities had Formula 1 folk positively purring with pleasure.

“It’s just unbelievable what the country has done to build a venue such as this,” said Red Bull Racing’s Christian Horner. “It’s quite mind-blowing really, and the circuit looks a quality circuit as well, not just a pretty background.”

Part of the attraction, of course, was the way in which the whole track came glowingly to life as daylight faded and floodlighting picked out the spectacular setting, its architecture bowing gracefully to the country’s past while welcoming the modern phenomenon of Grand Prix racing with open arms.

The quickest man in Friday’s opening practice session was none other than Lewis Hamilton, who was then a McLaren driver, albeit with Mercedes power. Hamilton is one of just five drivers in the 2018 field who competed in Abu Dhabi back in 2009, the others being Sebastian Vettel, Kimi Räikkönen, Fernando Alonso and Romain Grosjean.

When things got serious in Saturday’s qualifying, Hamilton was first to claim pole at Yas Marina with a lap of 1:40.948 in Q3, though he had been quicker in both Q1 and Q2. Alongside him was Vettel’s Red Bull – so neither Brawn could make it to the front row.

That simply underlined the fact that the 2009 season was the proverbial game of two halves. While Button won six times, those victories all came within the opening seven rounds. His teammate Rubens Barrichello claimed Brawn’s other two wins in 2009, and the fourth of their 1-2 finishes came in round 13 in Italy.

But no-one was complaining, least of all Button’s competitors. Jarno Trulli of Toyota put it succinctly.

“When he had the best car, he proved he was a race-winning driver,” said the Italian. “And when he didn’t, he stayed cool and he collected the points. He deserves to be champion.”

But in the end neither the new world champion nor the pole-sitter could write his name in the Yas Marina history book – not yet, at least. Hamilton was sidelined by a right rear brake issue after 20 laps, leaving Vettel to bring his Red Bull home for the fifth win of his fledgling career.

Button did, however, light up the race with his pursuit of Vettel’s teammate, Mark Webber, in the closing stages. The Australian, fresh from victory in Brazil, produced one of the finest drives of his F1 career to keep Button at bay and make it a Red Bull 1-2 finish ahead of the two Brawns.

“I thought I could pull it off,” Jenson said, ‘”but Mark is always hard to pass. We were on the edge, but it was good fun, and clean.”

Webber agreed.

“I knew it would be fair and hard, and it was,” he added. “It’s good to have a ding-dong fight with the world champion.”

And in his typical pithy fashion, it was Webber who also had the last word on F1’s newest destination.

“It’s an awesome place when it’s lit up,” he said.

The intervening years have done nothing to contradict that view.

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Tickets for the 10th Abu Dhabi Grand Prix now on sale

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Tickets are now on sale for the 10th anniversary of the Abu Dhabi Grand Prix with fantastic packages to take advantage of.

Incorporating the theme of ‘Swipe Up’, this year’s event which will run between November 23 to 25, will provide local, regional and international fans with all new layers and added value at the #AbuDhabiGP, providing more choice than ever before.

For the first time, Yas Marina Circuit will offer ticket buyers the choice of booking their preferred seats in one of the five available Grandstands when buying online. This allows fans, families and entertainment seekers to pre-select their favourite seating options across the incredible array of ticket packages for the race.

To help guests celebrate in style for 2018, the circuit has upgraded and revitalised its hospitality products, with totally new ticket options across a range of categories available.

New for the anniversary, the one-day Paddock Club ticket has been created. Available for Dh3,450 the new Friday-only ticket package provides race goers with the ultimate experience and includes exclusive Paddock access, premium food and beverage options, plus the popular Thursday and Friday night After-Race Concerts.

And visitors can book the new Terrace Hospitality packages in Main Grandstand with views of Turn 1 or North Grandstand, overlooking the hairpin and enjoy upscale hospitality located at the ends of each Grandstand.

Families can also celebrate as organisers confirm that last year’s popular ‘Kids Go Free’ package will return in 2018, providing additional flexibility and value.

With each three-day adult Grandstand ticket purchased, ‘Kids Go Free’. Up to four children under 12 will get free Friday entry to that Grandstand, as well as enjoying free access to the three Yas Island parks.

Discounts are available until May 31.

For more information on ticket packages, visit www.yasmarinacircuit.com.

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