Brooks Koepka's advantage and other talking points ahead of 148th Open Championship

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Francesco Molinari will defend his Open title next week as the year’s final major championship takes place from July 18-21.

Here, PA looks at five talking points ahead of the first Open at Royal Portrush since 1951.

Will local knowledge help Brooks Koepka lift the Claret Jug?

Koepka has never been to Northern Ireland, let alone Portrush, but the world number one’s caddie, Ricky Elliott, is a local and knows the course well from his own playing days, when he would often compete against another Portrush native Graeme McDowell.

Elliott admits his yardage book will need to be adapted for some of the lines the big-hitting Koepka will be able to take, but there is no doubt he will be a big asset as the American seeks a fifth major title in his last 10 starts.

Has Tiger Woods made a mistake with his preparation?

Woods did not compete between winning his 15th major title in the Masters and the following month’s US PGA Championship and went on to miss the cut at Bethpage. The 43-year-old did play the Memorial Tournament before a tie for 21st in the US Open at Pebble Beach, but has again not played since and three-time major winner Padraig Harrington believes that is a mistake.

“If you’re serious about trying to win the Open you should be playing at least one, if not two, of the events running into it. I would say two if you can handle three events in a row,” Harrington said. It is doubtful if Woods could handle that following spinal fusion surgery in April 2017 but it would be dangerous to write him off.

Can US dominance of the majors be broken?

With Woods winning the Masters, Koepka retaining his US PGA title and Gary Woodland winning the US Open, American players have won 14 of the last 19 majors and Open champion Francesco Molinari is the only non-American to currently hold a major title.

The last time American players completed a clean sweep of major titles was in 1982, when Craig Stadler won the Masters, Tom Watson the US Open and Open Championship and Ray Floyd claimed the US PGA.

Will Rory McIlroy end his major drought on home soil?

McIlroy is the course record holder at Portrush after carding a 61 in the North of Ireland Championship as a 16-year-old schoolboy and will have massive support, but his last major title came in the 2014 US PGA Championship and his most recent chance of victory fizzled out with a disappointing closing 72 in the US Open.

The previous week’s victory in Canada showed what the 30-year-old is capable of and a sell-out crowd will be hoping he can reproduce that form and lift the Claret Jug for a second time.

Will the week be a success?

In terms of hype, excitement and ticket sales, the first Open in Northern Ireland for 68 years can already be considered a triumph. Plans for an Orange parade after the third round had caused consternation in some quarters, but the parade has been scrapped and replaced with a “celebration of marching bands” which locals believe will be viewed as interesting rather than offensive.

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US Open: Gary Woodland takes the lead as Justin Rose searches for extra gear over weekend

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Justin Rose believes he will need to find an extra gear over the weekend to claim a second US Open title as Rory McIlroy plotted a “boring” path to glory at Pebble Beach.

Rose carded a second round of 70 to post consecutive sub-par scores in the tournament for the first time in his career and set a clubhouse target which was only overtaken late in the day by American Gary Woodland.

Woodland’s flawless 65 matched the lowest score in a US Open at Pebble Beach, which was set by Tiger Woods on his way to a record 15-shot victory in 2000 and equalled by Rose on Thursday.

At nine under par, Woodland led by two shots from Rose, with former Open champion Louis Oosthuizen on six under and McIlroy a shot further back alongside American Aaron Wise after veering from the sublime to the ridiculous and back again in his 69.

Defending champion Brooks Koepka, who is seeking a hat-trick of US Open titles and a fifth major victory in his last nine starts, was ominously placed on four under in a group which also contained England’s Matt Wallace, who was third in the US PGA Championship behind Koepka last month.

Graeme McDowell, who lifted the trophy at Pebble Beach in 2010, is three under par after a round of 70, with Masters champion Tiger Woods nine strokes off the pace following a disappointing 72.

“I’m happy although I felt like it was an opportunity to go a couple better,” said Rose, who started from the 10th and went out in 34 after birdies on 15 and 18.

“I felt like I left two or three out there coming in but parring eight and nine at least makes me feel like I’ve got something out of the day.

“I have no expectations for the weekend really. I just like my position, the course and the way I’m trending but I still don’t feel like I’m cooking and I’m going to need to find that (extra) gear if I’m going to hoist some silverware on the weekend.”

McIlroy was three under for his round after 12 holes before dropping a shot on the 13th and then running up a double bogey on the par-five 14th after spinning his approach off the green and dumping his next shot into a bunker.

The 30-year-old was understandably furious and could still be seen muttering to himself even after making amends with a birdie on the 15th, but his mood was improved considerably by another birdie on the next.
“It was a bit of an unforced error on 14, I took a club that was not going to get to the back third of the green even after seeing other players do the same,” McIlroy said.

“But I bounced back well and those birdies on 15 and 16 were huge to get me right back into this golf tournament this weekend.

“It’s boring and a cliche but you need to hit fairways and greens round here. I did not do that for a few holes on the back nine and paid the price and was lucky to bounce back.”

Koepka could also reflect on a number of missed opportunities but remained well placed to maintain his remarkable recent record in majors and join Scotland’s Willie Anderson (1903-05) as the only player to win three straight US Opens.

“I’m good at this patient game, I know you just need to be hanging around on the weekend,” Koepka said. “I have a chance, just have to clean it up for the weekend. If I can putt the way I did on Thursday and hit it like I did today, it’s a good combination.”

Woods, who single-putted 11 greens in an opening round of 70, was on course for his first bogey-free round in any US Open since his final round here in 2000 after one birdie and 15 pars, but bogeyed his last two holes.

The cut fell at two over par and Wales’s Rhys Enoch made it right on the mark thanks to a superb second round of 66.

Provided by Press Association Sportย 

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Rory McIlroy warms up for Masters with St Patrick's Day Players Championship victory

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Rory McIlroy celebrated St Patrick’s Day in brilliant style with victory in the prestigious Players Championship after a thrilling final round at Sawgrass.

After proving his critics wrong by joining Sandy Lyle as the only British winners of the so-called “fifth major”, McIlroy will take renewed confidence into his bid to win a genuine fifth major title at the Masters to complete the career grand slam.

McIlroy recovered from an early double bogey to card a closing 70 and finish 16 under par, one shot ahead of former Ryder Cup captain Jim Furyk, who had threatened to become the oldest winner in tournament history.

Furyk set the clubhouse target with a 67 that included two birdies in the last three holes, the 48-year-old – who is less than a month older than 2005 champion Fred Funk – hitting a brilliant approach to just three feet at the last.

However, McIlroy bounced back from a bogey on the 14th with birdies at the next two holes to move back into the lead and safely negotiated the treacherous 17th and 18th to secure a 15th PGA Tour title after starting the season with five consecutive top-six finishes.

McIlroy told Sky Sports: “It’s very special. I just tried to treat it like any other day. Even though I’ve had all those close calls this year, they didn’t mean anything.

“If anything they were good for me, I called them ‘remote misses’, it gives you even more hope to go forward and go again. I think all those experiences this year led me to this point and ultimately they were good for me because it got me over the line today.

“The birdie on 12 was huge to give me a bit of momentum and the final few holes were tough. To get that birdie on 15 after the dropped shot on 14 was massive.

“I knew 16 was a good chance and to par the last two holes and hit three good shots when I needed to, that gives me a lot of confidence going forward.”

The victory comes just weeks before McIlroy will attempt to win the Masters and become only the sixth player to complete a career grand slam.

The 29-year-old Northern Irishman added: “If I hadn’t have won today I would have said I don’t need a win going into Augusta, but it’s very nice to get a win, especially doing it on this golf course, honestly a golf course that played a little bit similar to the way Augusta will play in a few weeks’ time.

“I can take a lot from this. It’s taken me a few weeks to get to this point but I feel like I’m playing some of the best golf of my life right now and I just need to keep going with it and keep doing the same things.”

On his tournament debut, England’s Eddie Pepperell shared third place with Venezuela’s Jhonattan Vegas on 14 under, both players holing improbable birdie putts on the 17th in matching rounds of 66.

“I actually thought it was going to miss low until right at the end and I was pretty excited,” Pepperell said. “I said to Mick (Doran, his caddie), that may be the highlight of my career – I hope I don’t peak too early.

“Honestly I felt like I swung the club terrible today. I kept hitting it right with my 3-wood, which is the club I bank on and I was useless with that.

“My irons I was hitting pretty well and the last six holes around the greens I was on fire – I felt like Seve (Ballesteros) out there to be fair.”

Compatriot Tommy Fleetwood, who began the day in joint second with McIlroy, gave himself an outside chance of forcing a play-off with his Ryder Cup team-mate with an eagle on the 16th, only to promptly hit his tee shot on the 17th into the water.

And overnight leader Jon Rahm also found the water on the same hole on his way to a final round of 76 that left the Spaniard in a tie for 12th.

Tiger Woods saved his best round of the week until last with a 69 and also believes he is in good shape ahead of the Masters.

“It’s right on track,” Woods said. “I’m able to shape the ball both ways, which I’m going to need there. I just need a few more putts to go in, but that’s it.”

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