Pakistan's 50-over approach under scrutiny as Australia ODI whitewash exposes flaws

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • Mail
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • WhatsApp
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn
A chastening 5-0 series whitewash for Pakistan at the hands of Australia.

The 20-run defeat in the fifth and final ODI against Australia was symbolic of Pakistan’s struggles in the five-match series with the Men in Green falling short once again of the required gold standard in 50-over cricket.

It was the final ‘home’ series for Pakistan before their departure to England for a five-match ODI series before the ICC World Cup. A 5-0 whitewash at the hands of the Aussies has left the team with plenty of questions to be answered before the global showpiece.

Pakistan have not won a bilateral ODI series against any team not named Zimbabwe since October, 2017. For all their dominance in the T20 format where they are deservedly ranked No1, Pakistan have failed to translate that success into their 50-over displays where they remain a tier below top teams like England, India and Australia.

Granted, they were missing the likes of Babar Azam, skipper Sarfraz Ahmed, Fakhar Zaman, Shadab Khan and Hasan Ali in the series against Australia, yet the manner of their defeat has exposed plenty of gaping holes in the ODI outfit.

Their inability to force the scoring-rate with the bat was all too evident in the five losses and they were duly punished by a clinical Australia who are starting to click into gear at just the right time.

Quite simply, if you fail to score 300 runs on a consistent basis against the top ODI teams in modern cricket, you will likely end up on the losing side as Pakistan have just found out the hard way.

Amassing 280 odd runs in the first two ODIs while batting first was a decent effort from Pakistan’s batsmen but it wasn’t nearly enough with the Aussies coasting to victory in both chases.

Haris Sohail has been one of the few positives.

Haris Sohail has been one of the few positives.

The lack of intent stems from the very top where opener Imam-ul-Haq has struggled to up the ante. The top-order batsmen have failed to score runs at a fair clip and this in return has left the lower order with all to do when it comes to accelerating the scoring rate. If not for some quick-fire cameos from Imad Wasim in the death overs, the report card for Pakistan’s batting would have been even more dismal.

The returns of Babar and Fakhar into the playing XI will no doubt help address some part of this problem but those two alone cannot provide a miracle fix for the unit as a whole. What the team desperately needs is an enforcer in the middle-order and it looks like veteran Shoaib Malik will have to fill that role at the World Cup.

Pakistan would have hoped for Umar Akmal to come good on his international return to provide another alternative to Malik but the right-hander failed to seize his opportunity with some inconsistent displays.

Apart from the lack of intent, the team remains vulnerable to collapses as shown by their defeat in the fourth ODI where they choked to throw away a winning position.

Mohammad Amir's white-ball struggles continue.

Mohammad Amir’s white-ball struggles continue.

With the ball, Mohammad Amir’s struggles on UAE pitches continued with the senior pacer dropped after just one poor display. It looked like the team management were trying to prevent a further drop in Amir’s confidence after the first ODI which only begs the question as to why he was picked in the first place.

The left-armed seamer might still board the World Cup plane given his 2017 Champions Trophy displays in England, but he is now a shadow of the bowler he was when bursting onto the stage as a teenager.

Young Mohammad Hasnain was barely given a chance to make an impact while Test specialists Yasir Shah and Mohammad Abbas did themselves no favours.

There were a few positives to take for Pakistan like the form of Haris Sohail, Mohammad Rizwan and Abid Ali, but those are too few and far in between.

It will of course be a vastly changed Pakistan team in the World Cup but Mickey Arthur and Co have plenty of work to do in changing their whole approach towards 50-over cricket.

Most popular

Radical changes needed to arrest Pakistan's declining batting standard in Test cricket

Amer Malik 13/02/2019
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • Mail
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • WhatsApp
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn
Pakistan's batsmen have struggled in the Test format of late.

There are a few constants in the universe. We know the Earth takes 365 days, give or take, to revolve around the Sun. We know it rises every morning. And we know Pakistan can’t bat. This isn’t some airy theorem. It has baffled most cricketing scientists: chasing scores, be it large or small, they never fail to fail. QED.

With the Pakistan Super League due to start in a few days, this should give the national team breathing space to uncover more hidden talent, though not necessarily improve their long-term batting woes.

This tale isn’t a new one, it’s been there since the creation of the Pakistan team. You could forgive it with a new-born team, but 70 years on they are still making rudimentary mistakes, some of which I wouldn’t expect my 10 year-old to make. Certainly enough time has passed to iron out any immature indiscretions, or so one would have thought.

The 1970s gave Pakistan the likes of Zaheer Abbas, Majid Khan and the battle-hardened Javed Miandad. The last of these played well into the 1980s and 1990s alongside the likes of Mudassir Nazar, Mohsin Khan and the graceful Salim Malik the 1980s to back him up at the other end. Even Imran Khan, when he couldn’t bowl for an extended period, played as a batsman, and one could pretty much depend on him to hold down an end.

Javed Miandad in action against England.

Javed Miandad in action against England.

In the 1990s there came the languid Inzamam, though he didn’t need to run much especially with his exquisite stroke play, Ijaz Ahmed – and an older Salim Malik and Saeed Anwar. These were players you could rely on to set large totals or chase them down or die trying, and try they did, most times, though they were not without flaws.

The late 1990’s probably produced some Pakistan’s best batsmen ever, Mohammed Yousuf, Younis Khan and Misbah ul Haq. So what went wrong? Why haven’t the current crop learnt from some of these greats. They have been mentored by some of them, by Miandad, Mohsin and Younis Khan, and two of these have had stints as national coach. Yet has that helped?

From past PSL tournaments, Pakistan have been able to source talent for the shorter formats, but this doesn’t resolve the issue for the longer and most quintessential form of the game. Recently they have been undone by both New Zealand and South Africa, with the batting capitulating in both series, much to the dismay of Mickey Arthur.

If he had any hair left, I’m sure he’d have pulled it out due to sheer frustration. Since the retirements of Misbah and Younis, no one has stepped up. Players such as Asad Shafiq have now been playing Test cricket for seven years, but have still to evolve as batsmen, succumbing to pressure, unable to cope on fast and bouncy wickets. Azhar Ali has a triple ton to his name but is another who is found out quite easily in similar alien conditions.

The retirements of Misbah and Younis has left a big hole.

The retirements of Misbah and Younis has left a big hole.

This in part isn’t the fault of the batsman but of the infrastructure of grassroots cricket in Pakistan itself. The wickets are bone dry and flat, which then exposes technique and temperament when playing in South Africa or Australia. Pakistan certainly have the talent, but what use is that if you can’t utilise those abilities everywhere. No amount of coaching will help, it’s more a case of a psychological front foot block.

There is only so much even Grant Flower can do. They don’t need a coach, but a sports psychologist who can help them fight their inner demons when confronted by alien conditions. Pakistan have yet to win an away series in the two aforementioned countries.

Look at how India have developed as a major force in Test cricket, and have won a series in Australia, albeit against a weaker than normal side (without David Warner and Steve Smith), but the conditions were as alien to them as they were for any other team. They showed the mental resilience to overcome the odds and win a series. This should gee Pakistan up if anything.

If Pakistan are to do well then the new guys at the top, Ehsan Mani and Wasim Khan, have their work cut out for them. They will need to improve everything from grassroots level upwards; change the way wickets are prepared in the country, abolish departmental teams, and bring in regional sides, a template similar to that of the Australian Sheffield Shield competition. That could do wonders, creating more competition for a limited amount of places.

If Pakistan are to change their batting mind-set then the changes will have to be drastic, and start to be implemented as soon as possible given they are currently ranked at No 7 in the Test rankings after being at No 1 as recently as 2016.

They will need to reach the speed of light quickly before the force of gravity really pulls them down.

Most popular

Mohammed Shami's ODI resurgence a timely one for India ahead of 2019 World Cup

Ashish Peter 29/01/2019
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • Mail
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • WhatsApp
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn
Mohammed Shami's ODI career has been revived.

The ODI series against New Zealand was meant to be a true test of India’s chances at the 2019 ICC World Cup and the visitors could not have been more emphatic in their response.

Virat Kohli and his men have put the Kiwis to the sword in all three ODIs to race away to an unassailable 3-0 lead in the five-match. The Men in Blue looked imperious in their first ODI series win on New Zealand soil in over a decade.

There have been plenty of positives to take for the tourists from their three victories against the Kiwis including the fine return of all-rounder Hardik Pandya from his suspension. However, the most pleasing aspect of India’s dominance over Kane Williamson and his men has been the form shown by pacer Mohammed Shami.

In the No1 ranked Jasprit Bumrah and the ever-reliable Bhuvneshwar Kumar, India have two of the most potent pacers in the ODI format. It has been the third seamer that has been one of the bigger headaches for India in the run-up to the World Cup.

Various bowlers have tried for that role in recent months including the likes Khaleel Ahmed, Siddarth Kaul, Shardul Thakur, Deepak Chahar and Mohammed Siraj. None of these players have been able to make a convincing statement.

All this while, the remedy to India’s third-pacer woes was right in front of their eyes; just that that they have bothered to look just now. Shami was one of the key bowlers for India in the 2015 World Cup in Australia and New Zealand and finished as the joint third-highest wicket-taker in the tournament with 17 scalps to his name.

From being one of India’s leading pacers in the 2015 edition, Shami’s poor track record with injuries combined with poor form saw him become marginalised in the ODI setup in the years that followed. In the three-year period between 2016 and 2018, Shami played only five ODIs for India of which four came against the West Indies.

The 28-year-old found himself transitioning into a Test specialist for the country with his appearances being limited to India’s whites for the most part. Shami’s limited-overs international career seemed to be at the crossroads until he was given an unexpected ODI recall for the home series against the West Indies last year.

That recall came about only due to the absence of Bumrah and Bhuvneshwar in the series with Shami subsequently picking up three wickets in his two appearances. Despite those modest returns, the pacer was given an extended run in the one-day squad and was selected for the tours of Australia and New Zealand. He has not looked back since.

With Bumrah rested after his exertions in the Test series, Shami grabbed his opportunity with both hands by playing a pivotal role in India’s 2-1 triumph in the ODIs. He was economical in the first ODI before picking up five wickets in the next two including two in the decider at Melbourne.

In New Zealand, he has taken his form up a notch with seven scalps in the three games so far including man-of-the-match displays in the first and third ODIs.

Shami's good form has come just at the right time for Kohli.

He has been excellent with the new ball in both series and has even managed to overshadow Bhuvneshwar. His fitness woes look like a thing of the past as well with Shami looking in peak condition despite his heavy workload in the preceding Test series against Australia.

“The fast bowling group together believes they can knock any side over. And the belief in his (Shami) own ability and his fitness – this is the fittest I’ve seen him in his career. And his Test form has translated into one-day cricket,” Kohli gushed about the pacer after his display in the first ODI in Napier.

With such high praise from the India skipper and an impressive ODI track record which has seen him pick 106 wickets in 58 matches with an average of almost 25, Shami is certain to board the World Cup plane to England.

The quickest Indian bowler to reach 100 ODI wickets (56 games), Shami’s resurgence in white-ball cricket could not have come at a better time.

Most popular