Euro 2020: Rodrigo's late equaliser helps Spain hold Sweden and seal qualification

Press Association Sport 17:28 16/10/2019
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Image - Euro2020/Twitter

Spain needed an injury-time goal from Rodrigo to book their place at Euro 2020 with two matches to spare.

They fell behind to Sweden four minutes into the second half after Spain goalkeeper David De Gea made a double save to deny Berg and Emil Forsberg, only for the ball to loop up in the air for Berg to nod into an empty net.

Moments later De Gea had to pull off a sharp save down to his right to prevent Forsberg from doubling the lead.

But Spain’s problems deepened when De Gea, who had made a stunning save to deny Robin Quaison in the first half, limped off with what appeared to be a hamstring injury.

They looked on course for a first defeat of the campaign until substitute Rodrigo fired through a crowded penalty area at the death to clinch a 1-1 draw.

Rodrigo scored the equalizer against Spain

Rodrigo scored the equaliser against Spain

Sweden were left grateful to Alexander Sorloth, who scored a late equaliser for Norway in Romania.

The 1-1 draw means Romania stay a point behind the Swedes in third, while the Faroe Islands beat fellow Group F also-rans Malta 1-0.

Republic of Ireland, who knew a win in Switzerland would see them through, were beaten 2-0 thanks to Haris Seferovic’s 16th-minute strike and a late Shane Duffy own goal.

Haris Seferovic has been directly involved in 10 goals in his last 8 home games for Switzerland.

Haris Seferovic has been directly involved in 10 goals in his last 8 home games for Switzerland.

The visitors were reduced to 10 men in the 76th minute when Seamus Coleman handled Breel Embolo’s shot in the area.

The full-back was shown a second yellow card and, although Darren Randolph saved Ricardo Rodriguez’s penalty, Ireland could not find an equaliser, with Duffy diverting Edimilson Fernandes’ shot into his own net three minutes into injury time.

Elsewhere in Group D, minnows Gibralter came from 2-0 down to level against Georgia only to fall to Giorgi Kvilitaia’s late goal.

Italy, already assured of qualification, took the lead in after just two minutes in Liechtenstein through Federico Bernardeschi.

But they had to wait until the 70th minute to find the net again through Andrea Belotti’s header before Alessio Romagnoli, Stephan El Shaarawy and Belotti again wrapped up a 5-0 win.

Norwich striker Teemu Pukki scored twice in a comfortable 3-0 victory over Armenia. Pukki struck twice in the second half after Fredrik Jensen opened the scoring for the hosts, who are second behind Italy in Group J.

A late own-goal by Adnan Kovacevic dented Bosnia and Herzegovina’s chances of catching Finland as they went down 2-1 in Greece.

In Group G Israel beat whipping boys Latvia 3-1.

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Barca vs Man United serves a reminder for Champions League's much-needed overhaul

Andy West 08:17 17/04/2019
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A fine night at the Nou Camp with Messi weaving his magic.

Irrespective of which team you support or the outcome, it’s fair to say that Barcelona and Manchester United locking horns is the kind of football match that pretty much any fan would want to see.

So, here’s an idea…maybe, just maybe, we could arrange it for them to play a bit more often?

Tuesday night’s meeting was the first time they had played at the Camp Nou since 2008, when a goalless draw was part of a two-legged United victory en route to the Champions League Final, which saw them defeat Chelsea in Moscow. If you need to be reminded how long ago that was, it was before Pep Guardiola took over as Barcelona manager, and a young defender called Gerard Pique was on the bench for United.

Since then there have, of course, been a couple of finals, both won by Barcelona in 2009 and 2011. But in terms of games at their own venues in front of passionate home crowds, this year’s meetings were the first for more than a decade.

That, if you stop to think about it, is just madness. And it is one of the reasons why a remodelled Champions League – call it a European Super League, if you like – could be (emphasis on ‘could’) far, far better than most fans seem to fear.

And yes, fear is the word. That simple phrase, European Super League, is guaranteed to strike anguish into hearts and provoke the ire of the majority of the continent’s fans, who appear to be terrified that evil and greedy moneymen are poised to steal the soul of their beautiful game.

To an extent, that concern is justified. If we all just rolled over and let the big clubs have what they want, some factions within that elite would be positively delighted to create a new closed league, with no promotion or relegation, and membership purely decided by economic might and marketing potential.

No real football fans want to see that.

However, that does not mean the current Champions League model is perfect and should be retained in its present state. There are far too many dead games, with the competition not really coming alive until the knockout stages in February, a full six months after the start of the European season.

In the group stages, most games are irrelevant because we know who is going through anyway, and even the occasional shocks end up counting for nothing other than one isolated night of joy for the underdog’s fans. Witness, for example, the respective victories gained this season over Liverpool and Real Madrid by Red Star Belgrade and CSKA Moscow, neither of whom qualified for the next round whereas the big clubs, inevitably, did.

Let’s be honest: teams like that do not belong in a tournament alongside the very best. They are simply not good enough to make it a fair or interesting competition – especially when their presence also means, as we have seen with the 11-year gap between Manchester United’s visits to Barcelona, the best teams rarely get the chance to actually play against each other.

So, what can be done? Well, rather than just sticking our heads in the sand and pretending the European Super League demands of the elite will simply go away, why don’t we accept reality and force them to compromise and negotiate?

That way, maybe we can have a new competition for the top teams which still requires qualification from domestic competitions, or incorporates relegation and promotion from the Europa League. What’s more, perhaps we could insist the giants share a decent proportion of their revenues with the lower parts of the football pyramid and grassroots initiatives.

We can also demand that ticket prices are kept low, and guarantee that at least one match every gamenight is shown on free to air television.

Doesn’t that sound appealing? Just because the worst case scenario of a European Super League would be unpalatable, that doesn’t mean there can’t be an acceptable middle ground.

Or, then again, maybe you’d prefer to just wait for the next game between Barcelona and Manchester United in 2030.

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Juventus had right idea with Cristiano Ronaldo in football world obsessed with age

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When a fee is attached to a name you can almost feel the thrumming of mental arithmetic in the air. ‘£50 million for a 29-year-old … which means he has 39.4 months of good football in him. Factor in the three previous injuries, divide by the amount of wrinkles on his face …. and you’ve got a rip-off’.

Truly, football is a workplace where thoroughly well-remunerated ageism is rampant.

Sympathy for slightly older, privileged young men may be rightfully in short supply – but these are the players who win titles. ‘Resale value’ has yet to win a game.

MOURINHO’S RAGE OVER AGE

JoseMourinhoUSTour (1)

Which is why it is easy, even allowing for his grumpy demeanour, to understand why Jose Mourinho is so frustrated by Manchester United’s tentative approach to the transfer market this summer.

Chief transfer negotiator Ed Woodward is reluctant to fork out £50m for either Ivan Perisic or Willian, both of whom are doomed to turn 30 very soon, given that he has already spent a hefty chunk on Nemanja Matic and Alexis Sanchez, two other players pushing their fourth decade.

As it turned out, the £40m paid for Matic – which caused many to wince at the time – is by any metric now considered a bargain. Sanchez’s first six months at Old Trafford did not pan out as smoothly as envisaged yet, even factoring in his wages, very few players of his ilk are ever available at such a cut-price – £25m – on the open market.

Woodward has also pussy-footed around Tottenham’s Toby Alderweireld, also the grand old age of 29, when United are crying out for a leader in defence.

But that’s Mourinho’s priority, not Woodward’s, who is happy if an inconsistent Eric Bailly retains his value while he is busy finding United’s next official green tea partner.

According to official figures, United earned £581m in 2016/17 – without Champions League revenue. Mourinho should reasonably be granted everything he demands but, always gnawing at the back of Woodward’s mind, is potential profit on the balance books over trophies in the cabinet.

WORTH THEIR WEIGHT IN YEARS

Domagoj Vida.

Domagoj Vida.

Of course, there are exciting teams in Europe who barely possess a veteran between them. Liverpool do not have a player aged 30 or older among their starting XI, though it should be said that they have not yet won a trophy under Jurgen Klopp, and are reportedly pursuing a 29-year-old Domagoj Vida to strengthen a defence that has long been their Achilles heel.

Manchester City boast some of the most intriguing young players in Europe yet are still anchored by Fernandinho, their chief creator David Silva is 32 and Vincent Kompany is a player’s player that the likes of a United do not possess.

The pattern only becomes clearer across Europe. Gerard Pique, at 31, remains emblematic of Barcelona’s defence. New arrival Clement Lenglet was bought in the hope, rather than the certainty, of replacing him while Colombia defender Yerry Mina’s youth seemingly won’t save him from the exit.

Ivan Rakitic, Sergio Busquets, Lionel Messi and Luis Suarez are among the 30-somethings. The lack of players to succeed them is a genuine concern but that is a problem with the pipeline at La Masia drying up, rather than the effectiveness of the current squad.

Real Madrid would not have won the Champions League three times in a row without Sergio Ramos, Luka Modric and Cristiano Ronaldo in a healthy autumn of their careers.

OLD LADY HAS THE RIGHT IDEA

0721 Ronaldo

The one club to have truly recognised the power of such ‘oldies’ is Juventus. They do not have the revenue stream of the Premier League, or even La Liga, but there is no prejudice in the pursuit of glory.

It is easy to say that Juve have staked their short-term future on a 33-year-old – a genetic freak of a 33-year-old – but Ronaldo is only one part of an experienced puzzle.

Under Max Allegri, the Old Lady featured the tenth-oldest starting XI in Champions League history back in 2016/17 in a 4-0 victory away to Dinamo Zagreb. Humbled only by a rampant Real in the final that year and the quarter-final last, the core remains intact.

Take what they’re worth in cash out of it. A 34-year-old Giorgio Chiellini is priceless. Blaise Matuidi was one of the star performers for France at the World Cup.

Mario Mandzukic is the hard-working attacker any squad needs, Claudio Marchisio, Juan Cuadrado and even Andrea Barzagli, at 37, experienced players to lean on.

Juve have got younger through the likes of Emre Can, Rodrigo Bentancur and Joao Cancelo recently but without dumping or marginalising their veterans.

Italians have always respected the value of years. So don’t be scared, Real Madrid, of replacing Ronaldo with a 31-year-old Edinson Cavani. Go for a 30-year-old Gonzalo Higuain, Chelsea, and be rewarded with goals.

There are no prizes in football awarded for economics. It’s time to respect the elders.

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