A Day With: Olympic medal-winning triathlete Henri Schoeman

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • Mail
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • WhatsApp
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn
On the podium: Henri Schoeman.

In many countries, certain sports are king. In a vast majority it’s football, in the Philippines basketball rules, Pakistan and India are cricket crazy and in China table tennis dominates the agenda.

In South Africa it’s rugby, but Henri Schoeman fell in love with triathlon. His brother is a former Olympic swimmer, while his father and coach Joe is a keen runner and cyclist, so it’s not that difficult to see why.

What’s more gruelling is forging a path to greatness, but the 25-year-old is on it. He won triathlon bronze in Rio earlier this year and is plotting International Triathlon Federation World Series domination in 2017.

In Rio, you became the first South African to win a triathlon medal at the Olympics. Put that into words.

I’m really proud of that. It was the first Olympic triathlon medal for a South African so it was a great thing to achieve. As an athlete you always want to go into a race wanting to win. I was going for a medal but the top five was a realistic goal, so a medal was a bonus.

I wanted to use this Olympics as experience for the next. I’ll be in my prime in four years, so to win a medal in Rio was just a bonus and I’m really happy for that.

Athletes always talk about four years’ time as being their time, so were you ahead of expectations this year, and what are your aims for Tokyo 2020?

It’s been a great blessing to get that medal earlier than expected. I still want to build and I still have plans to win the World Series, I want to be world champion.

Definitely in four or eight years’ time I want to take that top step, that’s a goal of mine. I want to use the experience and confidence of Rio.

I’m going to work on my running, you end with the run so you want to have the fastest run. As a weak link in my repertoire it’s definitely something I’ve been working on and something I’m going to continue working on, to become one of the best runners in the sport. If I can do that the other achievements will come.

Compatriot Richard Murray is among the best triathletes in the world. How good is it for the country to have two South Africans at the sport’s pinnacle?

It’s really good. We had a strong performance at the Olympics with third and fourth and it shows we’re on the map. It’s great exposure for the country as we don’t really have a strong following here.

The Olympics gave us a lot of exposure so now lots more people are asking questions about it, so it’s great. Hopefully it will boom over the next few years and a lot more youngsters will get involved.

How much of an inspiration has he been?

We’re good friends, especially when I first came onto the World Series. Richard was my room-mate a couple of times. We get along and it’s great having him around. He put triathlon on the map for South Africa first so it’s great for the country.

You are both confirmed for the start of the 2017 ITF World Series in Abu Dhabi. How excited are you about coming here and what will be an acceptable finish for you?

I want to start how I finished, with a medal. After the off-season you kind of never know where you are with your preparations, if you’re behind or building up, because it’s a long year. It’s hard to judge but it’s a key race for all athletes to see where they are.

Abu Dhabi is often the most competitive field and it’s usually a big test after the off-season.

What are your past experiences of Abu Dhabi?

I’ve been here the last two years. It’s a great experience with the weather. It showcases the best of the capital as an international destination. The attractions and facilities are awesome, it’s such a scenic area.

On the podium: With Britain's Brownlee brothers.

On the podium: With Britain’s Brownlee brothers.

You finished last season with victory in the Grand Final in Mexico. Was it strange to win as you did, with Alistair Brownlee aiding his brother Jonathan who almost collapsed due to heat exhaustion?

It’s never the best way to win a race. I felt gutted for Jonny that he had those issues at the end of the race, but a race is a race and you have to time your nutrition and energy level expenditure.

It’s all a part of racing and I guess he mistimed that. Maybe he was under pressure as he’s never had me up there running with him before, maybe he felt like he had to attack and it cost him his race. But it was a great feeling for me to win.

I’m the fourth person ever to win a World Series Grand Final, Javier Gomez, Alistair Brownlee and Mario Mola are the only other ones, so to be up there with those names is quite an achievement.

What are your career highlights?

There’s a few. The big two are winning the Grand Final and third place in the Olympics. Also finishing fourth in the WTS rankings at the end of the year. Commonwealth Games silver medal in the team relay in 2014 and winning a World Cup in Tongyeong in 2014.

What is your favourite city to race in?

Either Hamburg or Stockholm. Stockholm, I really like the history with the buildings and the views. Hamburg it’s because of the spectators. There’s thousands of them around the course which is a really cool vibe when you race.

What do you do away from triathlon?

I enjoy video editing. I spend a lot of time with my girlfriend and friends, and I like walking on the beach. Simple things.

Growing up in rugby and cricket-mad South Africa, how did you get interested in triathlon?

My brother Riaan was a swimmer. He went to the Olympics in Beijing in 2008 and London in 2012, competing in the 400m individual medley. It’s in the blood. He retired after London so now I’m carrying it on.

Growing up, my dad was always a sporty person, involved in lots of running and cycling. We were always involved with swimming so eventually I wanted to reach out with running and cycling and at 18 I thought maybe it could be a path for me.

What advice do you have for kids taking up the sport?

Join a club and make it fun, learn with your friends. Get involved with races, challenge yourself and have fun with it.

Swimming and cycling are your strongest disciplines, but what’s your favourite of the three?

Running. I’m very passionate about it. When I was a boy I used to run quite a bit, dad was running on the track. I think it’s in me.

Recommended

Most popular

IN PICTURES: Thousands take in Spartan Race, Sharjah

Sport360 staff 19/11/2016
Turnout was incredibly high in Sharjah.

Sharjah hosted its first ever Spartan Race on Friday in Mleiha, attracting more than 10,000 visitors to the event.

In total, more than 2,400 participants from all across the globe took part in the race.

The Mleiha Spartan Race featured three main challenges, including the Spartan Beast, Spartan Spirit and Spartan Junior.

The Spartan Beast, held for the first time in the Middle East, is designed for professional and highly experienced athletes and adventurers. It includes a 20 km racetrack with more than 30 hard-hitting obstacles.

Marco Antonio Castro finished first in that ‘elite event, while Daoud Moustafa came second and Juan Carlos Lemus finished third.

In the female category, Amina Mhih finished first, followed by Angelique Chetanev who finished second and Sandra Chetanev Fuselier who came third.

“We were able to achieve something unique through the successful organisation of this race,” said Mahmoud Rashid Al Suwaidi, Manager of Mleiha Archaeological and Eco-tourism.

“It’s unprecedented success bears testimony to Mleiha Archaeological and Ecotourism Project having emerged as a potential venue for hosting major sports events in the UAE”.

“Mleiha also serves as one of the most unique tourist destinations in the region, making it an exceptional place of interest.”

Most popular

Striders Half Marathon proves a massive hit

Sport360 staff 19/11/2016
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • Mail
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • WhatsApp
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn
More than 2,000 runners participated.

Ssenyange has now won the past four editions of the annual event, which held its 32nd running on Friday at Yas Island in the capital.

The Ugandan improved on his winning time from last year with a significant jump of five minutes and 43 seconds to 1:06:10. He was also nearly nine full minutes ahead of second-place finisher Jeremy Curran.

Sedykh, meanwhile, set the pace for the women in a time of 1:22:31 as the Russian was trailed by Jill Majir (1:28:17) and Laura Holton (1:28:34).

In the shorter distance, Ash Chambers topped the men with a time of 0:32.04 and Anne-Mari Hyrylainen won for the women in 0:32:04.

Steve Watson, managing partner of organisers Gulf Multi Sport, said: “With a combination of cooler weather and ideal course set up for runners many participants secured PB’s for the start of the local running season.

“The support from the community, the stakeholder of Yas Island and of course the fantastic volunteers brought real atmosphere to the event that continues to develop and inspire the people of the UAE to take up running and adapt healthier lifestyle habits.”

Most popular