Eliud Kipchoge insists he is 'running to make history' in the IENOS 1:59 Challenge

Press Association Sport 16:01 10/10/2019
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Eliud Kipchoge insists he is “running to make history” when he bids to become the first marathon runner to break the two-hour barrier in Vienna on Saturday.

The Kenyan is taking his second official shot at the record – which would be unofficial – after missing out by 25 seconds in his first attempt in Monza two years ago.

Kipchoge will race alone in the IENOS 1:59 Challenge, but will he assisted by a rotating group of pace-setters, meaning his time cannot be officially ratified by the sport’s governing body, the IAAF.

Kipchoge, a four-time London Marathon winner who also holds the official marathon world record of 2:01.39, said: “I am running to make history – I am running to tell people no human is limited.

“It’s not about money, it’s about running and making history and changing the lives of people through their thinking.”

Kipchoge’s challenge will take place over 4.4 laps of the Prater Hauptallee in Vienna.

He added: “I feel more prepared (after Monza). I feel confident that I have been at that speed for the past two years.

“I came close the first time, but I hope the second time I can get it.”

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Sir Mo Farah's former coach Alberto Salazar banned from athletics for four years

Press Association Sport 09:34 01/10/2019
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Sir Mo Farah‘s former coach has been banned from athletics for four years for multiple anti-doping violations, the United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) has said.

American Alberto Salazar, 61, was sanctioned along with endocrinologist Jeffrey Brown for “orchestrating and facilitating prohibited doping conduct” while working with the Nike Oregon Project (NOP), USADA said.

Salazar’s violations included “administration of a prohibited method”, tampering or attempted tampering with athletes’ doping control processes and trafficking or attempted trafficking of testosterone.

The NOP was home to four-time Olympic champion Sir Mo from 2011 to 2017.

USADA chief executive officer Travis T Tygart said: “The athletes in these cases found the courage to speak out and ultimately exposed the truth.

“While acting in connection with the Nike Oregon Project, Mr Salazar and Dr Brown demonstrated that winning was more important than the health and wellbeing of the athletes they were sworn to protect.”

Brown was found to have tampered with records, administered an “over-limit” infusion and to have been complicit in Salazar’s trafficking of testosterone.

Salazar moved into coaching after a successful distance running career in which he won the New York Marathon three times and claimed victory once in the Boston Marathon in the early 1980s.

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Christian Coleman powers to 100m gold at World Athletics Championships

Press Association Sport 00:11 29/09/2019
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Christian Coleman stormed to 100 metres victory at the World Championships as Great Britain’s Zharnel Hughes missed out on a medal.

The American, who arrived in Doha following a missed drugs tests controversy, clocked a world leading time of 9.76 seconds to prove he was a class apart.

Justin Gatlin and Canada’s Andre De Grasse came second and third in Doha on Saturday night, with defending champion Gatlin missing out on a fourth world title.

European champion Hughes, who struggled with his start during the earlier rounds, was sixth in 10.03secs at the Khalifa International Stadium.

It was the first championships without Usain Bolt since 2003 and Coleman, who won silver in London two years ago, dominated – being the only man to run sub-10 in all three races.

In August the 23-year-old was charged with missing three drugs tests, which carried an automatic one-year ban.

He denied the charge and the US Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) withdrew it after guidance from the World Anti-Doping Agency.

Elsewhere, Jamaica’s Tajay Gayle won the long jump with the 10th biggest jump of all time, 8.69m.

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