Canelo floors Rocky Fielding four times to become 3-weight champ

David Cooper 16/12/2018
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • Mail
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • WhatsApp
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn
Rocky Fielding takes a count in his bout against Saul Alvarez

Saul Canelo Alvarez has become a three-weight world champion after knocking down Britain’s Rocky Fielding four times in three rounds to claim the WBA “regular” super-middleweight title at Madison Square Garden.

Alvarez, whose first professional titles came at welterweight, went into his first fight at 168lbs as the favourite, despite the fact he was fighting 21lbs and three divisions above where he first established himself.

The 28-year-old Mexican wasted no time in giving his opponent a taste of what was to come, bruising Fielding’s ribs with a huge body shot and sending him to the mat in the first round.

The 6ft 1in Liverpudlian recovered to get back on his feet, but the onslaught continued and he was knocked down again by another body shot in the second round.

A blow to the head sent 31-year-old Fielding to the floor for a third time in the third round, and it was when Alvarez’s relentless body shots sent Fielding crashing a fourth time that the referee decided he had seen enough.

Fielding, making a first defence of the title he won against Tyron Zeuge in July, managed to exchange some shots with his 5ft 9in opponent in the second round.

But he could not put his height advantage to good use and ultimately was outclassed by the world’s highest-paid athlete.

In October, the Alvarez signed a five-year, 11-fight contract worth a minimum 365million dollars (£290m).

Most popular

Related Tags

Related Sections

Anthony Joshua says he's ready for Deontay Wilder or Tyson Fury bout

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • Mail
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • WhatsApp
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn

Anthony Joshua claims he is ready to fight Deontay Wilder or Tyson Fury when they are ready.

The British heavyweight, holder of three of the four world belts, has been accused by some fight fans of ducking the big match-ups, while rivals Wilder and Fury had a thrilling brawl in Los Angeles at the weekend.

Fury called Joshua a “chicken” and a rematch between him and Wilder looks inevitable in the wake of their controversial draw.

That could mean Joshua being frozen out of the division’s top fights for a little while yet, but the 29-year-old reckons he is ready to go.

After Wilder’s co-manager Shelly Finkel suggested a Wilder-Joshua showdown could happen, Joshua wrote on Twitter: “What took this fool so long? Like we ain’t been interested?!

“Anyway well done Fury! They (Wilder) wanted to get to you because they assumed you was finished!! I’ll give you a fair one when your ready. Either one of you!”

Joshua’s promoter, Eddie Hearn, has gone to Los Angeles this week and says he is hoping to talk about an April date between his fighter and Wilder.

Fury’s promoter, Frank Warren, however, hopes to open talks over Fury-Wilder II.

Hearn told the Daily Mail: “First we need to find out what is happening with a Wilder-Fury rematch and whether the rematch clause we are hearing about is what it seems.

“If anything, the way that fight went on Saturday works in our favour in terms of getting Wilder. That has always been the fight we want because he has the last belt.

“It might also be the case that Wilder fancies his chances in a punch-out with AJ rather than another go at Fury. As far as AJ is concerned, he will fight anyone. He would love Wilder next and he has always wanted Fury.

“I am going out to LA and we will talk (with Wilder’s representatives) this week. It is a fight we definitely want for April and will work hard to make.”

Most popular

Related Sections

Tyson Fury's promoter Frank Warren to ask WBC for scorecard investigation

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • Mail
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • WhatsApp
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn
Tyson Fury and Deontay Wilder fought a memorable match in Los Angeles.

Frank Warren and the British Boxing Board of Control are to complain about the scorecards for Tyson Fury‘s drawn WBC heavyweight title fight with Deontay Wilder after the challenger was controversially denied victory.

The 30-year-old excelled throughout, impressively recovering from two knockdowns – the second remarkably heavy – but was harshly made the winner with only one of the three ringside judges after scores of 115-111 (in Wilder’s favour), 112-114, and 113-113.

Victory would have represented the completion of one of the finest comebacks in the history of the sport but, even with a rematch inevitable, Fury’s promoter and the BBBC will move to protect their fighter’s interests.

“I’ve spoken to Charlie Giles, president of the British Boxing Board of Control and they, along with us, will be writing to the WBC asking that they look at what’s gone on there and to order the rematch,” Warren said.

“The Mexican judge (Alejandro Rochin) got it wrong. I genuinely feel sorry for Tyson. He’s been robbed and it wasn’t right.”

Even amid the fact that for the first time Fury did not win, the nature of the fight – significantly more entertaining than when he awkwardly defeated Wladimir Klitschko – means Fury’s reputation is at its greatest.

Reflecting on what unfolded at Los Angeles’ Staples Center, the 30-year-old then said: “It was a great performance, if I do say so myself.

“I’m very happy with the fight, but put it this way, if I didn’t get knocked down twice in that fight, on one of the judge’s scorecards I’d have still lost, so he needs banning from boxing forever because he clearly can’t judge.

“Rochin, you need sacking, or to go to Specsavers, mate. Even without the knockdowns he still had me losing the fight.

“I’ve never seen a worse decision in my life. I don’t know what fight those judges were watching; the guy who gave it 115-111, I don’t know what he was watching. It ain’t the first time this has happened.

“That’s as bad a decision as the first Lennox Lewis-Evander Holyfield fight (in 1999), but who am I to say anything? I’m just a fighter, I’m not the judges. You can’t take anything away from me or Wilder; we done our best. (But) it’s stuff like this that gives boxing a bad name.”

Most popular

Related Sections