Chris Eubank Jr beats James DeGale in crunch super-middleweight clash

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Chris Eubank Jr has left James DeGale facing retirement after securing the finest victory of his career via a unanimous decision in their IBO super middleweight title match in London.

He had previously lost his two biggest fights, against Billy Joe Saunders and George Groves, but improved sufficiently to win an occasion DeGale said would force the loser to retire.

At 29 and with so high a profile there was little risk of that for Eubank Jr, but after his third defeat and a career in which he became the first British Olympic gold medallist to win a world title DeGale – the loser by scores of 114-112, 115-112 and 117-109 – has been left with few lucrative options to pursue.

The key was always likely to be whether DeGale retained enough of the abilities that once made him the IBF super-middleweight champion, which he both won and defended outside of his home city and in the US.

Until his bruising and damaging draw with Badou Jack he was sufficiently skilled and mobile to beat Eubank Jr, a natural middleweight, with ease but since then – in a defeat and then an unconvincing victory over Caleb Truax – he has struggled.

Even as the naturally smaller fighter there was every chance Eubank Jr possessed the physical – if not technical – advantages to impose himself.

It had been a year since he had lost so convincingly to Groves, owing largely to his size disadvantage and technical flaws, that in preparation for DeGale he had hired a new trainer in the little-known Nate Vasquez.

Following a cagey opener, Eubank Jnr hurt DeGale with a powerful left hook in the second that sent him into the ropes, and he followed up with a hurtful barrage that forced referee Michael Alexander to administer an eight count.

He was under similar threat at the start of the third, following a right hook that knocked him back, but after easing the pressure on himself and regaining his composure, he boxed with greater confidence in the fourth and fifth, landing with sharp jabs and evading the hooks his rival threw.

It was when DeGale began to move that Eubank Jnr began to look clumsy, swinging and missing with the type of punches that would test his conditioning, but for all that the older fighter’s defence often impressed, he was again guilty of throwing too little in return.

Eubank Jr remained a constant danger, disrupting DeGale with his aggression and maintaining the superior work-rate without being discouraged when he missed or was caught.

Another right landed towards the end of the eighth demonstrated that dominance, and a big 10th ultimately proved enough to secure victory. A left hook after they exchanged rights wobbled DeGale, before another barrage sent him to the canvas again.

If DeGale was already so far behind he required a knockout, he was given a lifeline when Eubank Jr was deducted a point for throwing him down in the 11th.

But in the 12th he did too little to win while also again being hurt, putting the result beyond doubt.

Eubank Jr told talkSPORT: “I’m back on top. I proved the doubters wrong.

“This is one of those fights which puts me in position to challenge for world titles now and I’m very happy.

“There was massive presssure. We were both on the edge of this cliff and someone’s was going to fall – and whoever falls can’t come back. I’m still here now, onwards and upwards.

“He’s a difficult fighter but I thought I dominated the entire fight.”

Asked whether Billy Joe Saunders could be his next opponent, Eubank said: “I’m not looking at him first and foremost, I don’t think he deserves it.

“There are other big names in the middleweight division…but there’s no one i wouldn’t fight. I’m here to collect the belts, whatever’s put in front of me I’ll take.”

Joe Joyce earlier secured the biggest victory of his professional career by stopping former WBC heavyweight champion Bermane Stiverne in six rounds.

There was also a win for Wales’ Lee Selby, who beat Omar Douglas at lightweight via a unanimous decision and scores of 116-112, 116-112 and 115-114.

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Losing not an option for James DeGale ahead of British battle with Chris Eubank Jnr

Nick Watkins 18/02/2019
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In shape: James DeGale ahead of his scrap with Chris Eubank Jnr

It seems odd to be talking of a retirement fight involving boxers in their early 30s and late 20s but, with their respective careers at a crossroads, that’s the situation both James DeGale and Chris Eubank Jnr find themselves in as they prepare to lock horns.

The pair are set to collide after years of verbal insults and social media-bashing, in a fight you get the impression both fighters need, rather than want.

DeGale, a former Olympic gold medallist and two-time world champion, is arguably a level above Eubank Jnr, who, despite being 29-years old, is yet to add a big-name scalp on his 27-2 record. Both men have two defeats on their resume and dare not lose their upcoming bout for fear of having nowhere else to turn in the sport.
Must win: Eubank Jnr is still looking for a big-name victory

Must win: Eubank Jnr is still looking for a big-name victory

DeGale, 32, should be at the top of his game, but injuries have hindered the later few years of his career leaving him with, by his own admission, less-than-impressive performances, one of which cost him his IBF world title to the vastly unfancied Caleb Truax.

Conscious of the effects a tough career has had on his body, ‘Chunky’ has had to adapt his training methods to ensure he’s ready for war come fight night.

“Time has gone so quick,” says DeGale speaking to Sport360°

“I’ve been working hard and putting in the graft for this fight, but I’ve had to change my training because of my injuries. I’ve taken out the majority of my running and I’m doing a lot of swimming and rowing as substitutes. It feels like I’m taking it back to when I was 22. I feel fresh and rejuvenated.”

The former world champion insists his new regime will bring out the best in him, but he can also expect to come up against the best Eubank Jnr – having finally hired his first full-time boxing trainer. Unfazed, DeGale continues to laugh off claims his rival is even in his league.

“I’m a realist and Chris Eubank ain’t. If I can’t beat him, it means I’ve gone backwards,” he says bluntly.

Although he himself knows he’s not been the boxer he could, and perhaps should, have been in recent times.

“A couple of years ago people wouldn’t have even put us together, but obviously my recent performances have ended up with us here. My last few performances have been below par, they haven’t been vintage me, if I’m being honest,” DeGale explains before detailing his achievements.

“The difference between us is I’m proven, I don’t have to go through my resume. I’ve won Olympic Gold, British champion, European champion, two-time world champion I’ve boxed the best in the world, I’ve fought in America, our careers are total opposites, when he has stepped up a level, he’s lost and that’s a fact.”

Eubank Jnr has indeed lost in both his biggest fights – to Billy Joe Saunders back in 2014 and most recently to George Groves a year ago. He comes into this domestic dust up following a glorified exhibition fight against Irishman JJ McDonagh at the end of August, further fuelling DeGale’s claims the former IBO title-holder isn’t up to the task.

“He’s earned a bit of money and had a right touch, he’s living off his Dad’s name. He’s had two proper opportunities and he’s lost both times. He’s tough, he’s got a lot of game, he’s got a good chin, he doesn’t mind if it gets hard and tough and you need that to be a good fighter, but he’s limited. He’s technically not the best.”

DeGale knows a loss to Eubank Jnr leaves him with little or no place to turn in the sport, especially after hopes of a big-money rematch against bitter rival Groves have been dashed with the Londoner announcing his retirement in January.Despite that, the two-time champ remains confident he holds the cards when it comes to dictating his future.

“I’ve learned from the past that I can’t plan too far ahead as you never know what’s going to happen in boxing,” he says. “I’ve still got a couple of years left. I don’t know what I’m going to do, I’m going to beat Eubank and sit back and be sitting in a very comfortable position. I may knock it on the head, I may have one more fight, I may have five more fights, I don’t know.

“Looking forward, I’m with the main man Al Haymon and he’s got a lot of world champions and there’s a lot of fights out there for me, when I come through this fight there’s going to be a choice of who to box.

“In terms of Eubank’s career, I’ve dubbed it the retirement fight, but I suppose he could go back down to middleweight, I’ve heard in interviews he’s a natural middleweight so he could have a go there. But I don’t think he’s world class. I really don’t.

Tasting defeat: A below-par DeGale lost to Caleb Truax at Copper Box Arena on December 9, 2017 in London

Tasting defeat: A below-par DeGale lost to Caleb Truax at Copper Box Arena on December 9, 2017 in London

“If I’m being honest the majority of my quality performances have been away from home but I see this as a second coming. I had three successful defences of my world title, then I got injured and my last couple of performances haven’t been vintage, but this time around I’m coming again. I’m going to beat him and have one more go at winning a world title.”

Money is often the defining factor in choosing what bout to take next when fighters reaches the twilight of their career. Eubank is expected to pocket a career-high purse from this scrap, and while DeGale won’t be doing badly himself, he insists the cash is nice, but it’s not why he’s getting in the ring.

He says: “Honestly the main motivation for me is the glory. I love being known for what I’ve done and who I’ve beaten in my career. Obviously the money comes with it and that’s just a bonus.”

DeGale v Eubank Jnr takes place at the O2 Arena, Saturday 23rd February. Tickets are available from www.AXS.com and Inner Ringside/VIP Hospitality from www.sportandmusic.co.uk. Watch exclusively live on ITV Box Office, for further information go to www.itvboxoffice.com

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Amir Khan reiterates desire to climb into the ring in Dubai before retiring

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Boxer Amir Khan, who has punched his way to an estimated $30 million fortune, says one of the best “money decisions” of his career was shaped in Dubai where he hopes to climb into the ring before hanging up his gloves.

Khan, who admits to making some bad decisions earlier in his career, has since been wise enough to protect his earnings against the financial traps that have broken many other boxing stars, including former world champion Mike Tyson.

“There are a lot of people out there who will promise you the world, but if it sounds too good to be true, it is,” says the 32-year-old British fighter who takes on America’s undefeated WBO welterweight world champion Terence Crawford on April 20 at New York City’s Madison Square Gardens.

“I’ve made mistakes and learnt from them. My advice to anyone with money that other people want to get their hands on is – do your research, ask as many questions as you can, trust your gut instinct and try not to surround yourself with ‘yes’ men.”

Khan followed his own advice and turned to Berkeley Assets, the private equity firm with offices in Dubai and London, to help build more financial security for himself and his family.

Amir Khan

The company brought him out to the emirate a few weeks ago to unveil him as their brand ambassador and discuss new business opportunities.

Looking after his interests in Dubai is Omar Jackson, Partner of Berkeley Assets, a keen boxing enthusiast himself who trains in a local gym and will be ringside for Khan’s much anticipated bout with Crawford.

The partnership began last summer when Berkeley Asset’s blockchain technology company, Cryptech World, sponsored Khan’s fight against Colombian Samuel Vargas, which he won on a unanimous points decision in Birmingham.

Khan, who has been a regular visitor to Dubai with wife Faryal in recent years, says he can count on one hand the number of fights he has left before retiring from the sport, and wants one of them to take place in the Emirates.

“There’s been quite a lot of talk about it happening, and I’d love to have a fight in Dubai, where I’ve got a lot of fans and has become my second home,” he said.

“Quite a lot of things have to come together to make it happen, but one thing I’ve learnt in my career is that boxing can produce surprises, so don’t rule it out.

“For the time being, my focus is the Terence Crawford fight. I couldn’t say no to it. I needed a fight to motivate me to train hard, and this is a massive fight. If I win, people will remember me as a great champion.”

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