Ineos' attempts to break Julian Alaphilippe reopen leadership debate at Tour de France

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Nairo Quintana earned victory on Stage 18.

Team Ineos’ attempts to break Julian Alaphilippe on the Galibier served mostly to reopen their own leadership debate as Egan Bernal leapfrogged Geraint Thomas on Stage 18 of the Tour de France.

Bernal attacked three kilometres from the summit of the Galibier, the last peak on a brutal 208 kilometres in the Alps, quickly distancing the group of favourites.

But when defending champion Thomas tried his own move one kilometre later, perhaps seeking to bridge to his young team-mate, he served only to drag Thibaut Pinot, Steven Kruijswijk and others with him.

They succeeded in dropping Alaphilippe on the steepest section of the climb, but only temporarily as the Frenchman used his outstanding descending skills to get back on the long descent to the finish, retaining his yellow jersey for a remarkable 14th day.

If these were questionable tactics from Ineos, those questions only multiplied as their co-leaders gave differing answers after the stage.

“We wanted a hard pace and unfortunately we ran out of guys,” Thomas said.

“The call was made for Egan to go and that kicked it off. I couldn’t do much then other than follow.

“I had a little dig just to see if anything was going to happen and the guys followed me over the top. It was a good day for Egan gaining some time.”

But Bernal insisted it was Thomas who had told him to attack.

“It was G’s decision,” the 22-year-old said. “He asked me how I was feeling. I said, ‘I’m feeling really good’ so he asked me to attack to try to move the race and he tried to come with me.

“But when he saw the other guys on his wheel he just stayed with them. But I attacked because he asked me to attack.”

On paper, the end result looks good. Alaphilippe may still hold yellow, but Ineos sit second and third, in pole position for when the expected implosion comes.

But the impression remains that Thomas’ move limited the gains Bernal might have made by increasing the pace behind him.

“We needed to gain time on Alaphilippe,” Bernal added. “I don’t care what happened with G. He is my team-mate and we needed to gain time.

“You never know how the other guys are and if you try to race hard at some point you can drop Alaphilippe and it’s on. I think we did a really good race.”

It is just another way in which Alaphilippe’s sensational run in yellow is changing this Tour, which remains wide open with only two mountain stages left.

Throughout the Pyrenees, teams raced as though waiting for him to fall away, but the first day in the Alps produced more pro-active attempts to make it happen.

He looked in trouble late on the Galibier, but the 19km descent into Valloire favoured the Frenchman, who flew down the mountainside, not only wiping out his deficit but nosing in front of the pack to make his point.

“I went to the front because I love going fast downhill, and I also wanted to show them that I came back,” the Deceuninck-Quick Step rider said.

Bernal may have clawed back time, but Alaphilippe still leads by 90 seconds, with Thomas a further five seconds back in third.

Jumbo-Visma’s Kruijswijk dropped to fourth, still one minute 47 seconds off yellow and three seconds ahead of Groupama-FDJ’s Pinot.

It proved a rough day for Kruijswijk. He saw key lieutenant George Bennett suffer a heavy fall on the final descent after beginning his day with a routine yet high-profile visit from anti-doping officials, who boarded the team bus in the paddock 45 minutes before the stage began, having missed the team at their hotel.

Thomas and Bernal had a similar visit of their own before breakfast, another little added stress before final confirmation came at the start that Luke Rowe’s expulsion from the Tour would not be overturned following Wednesday’s altercation with Tony Martin, who was also disqualified.

The stage victory went to Nairo Quintana, who salvaged some success from the race after his own bid for yellow fell flat.

Starting the day almost 10 minutes down, the Colombian was allowed to join a large breakaway.

The group splintered on the Col d’Izoard before Quintana powered away from Romain Bardet and Alexander Lutsenko on the Galibier to claim his third career Tour win, while Bardet had to settle for the polka-dot jersey as the King of the Mountains.

Talking of leadership debates, Quintana’s win moved him up to seventh overall, three minutes 54 seconds off yellow and now a minute ahead of team-mate Mikel Landa, who seemed unimpressed by the idea of working for Quintana over the next two days.

“Pfft,” he said before a long pause. “We will see, no? We have to play it tactically with our riders.”

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Julian Alaphilippe, Geraint Thomas and other contenders in thrilling 2019 Tour de France

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One of the most open editions of the Tour de France in decades will resume on Tuesday with only 39 seconds separating five riders between second and sixth, all of them breathing down the necks of what appears to be a fading Julian Alaphilippe.

The Pyrenees were enough to end the hopes of several big names – Adam Yates, Dan Martin, Nairo Quintana, Romain Bardet and more – so who are the men left in contention after 15 stages?

Julian Alaphilippe (Deceuninck-Quick Step) – Yellow jersey

Alaphilippe was never supposed to last this long in the yellow jersey – a punchy rider simply trying to make the most of the opportunities the parcours offered him in the opening week. The longer the Frenchman hung on – with his stunning time trial victory and his remarkable ride to second place on the Tourmalet – the more the home fans dreamed. But the first signs of weakness came on the roads above Foix on Sunday, and despite his 95 second lead, it already feels as though Alaphilippe is on the way down.

Geraint Thomas (Team Ineos) – Deficit: One minute 35 seconds

The defending champion looked strong in the opening week, bursting away from his rivals on La Planche des Belles Filles and maximising the crosswind chaos on stage 10 to gain more time. But questions emerged in the Pyrenees as he was distanced both on the Tourmalet and the Prat d’Albis. Despite that, Thomas remains second – in pole position if Alaphilippe is finally cracking as the race heads into the Alps. Was this simply a bad patch from which Thomas has emerged in an enviable position? Or was it a sign of deeper problems?

Steven Kruijswijk (Jumbo-Visma) – Deficit: One minute 47 seconds

With so much focus on Thomas’ time losses and the emerging French challenge, Kruijswijk has managed to fly a little under the radar despite sitting just 12 seconds behind the Welshman. Jumbo-Visma, despite losing Wout Van Aert to a crash and splitting their priorities between Kruijswijk and sprinter Dylan Groenewegen, have looked the strongest team in the mountains and Kruijswijk has been impressive if not explosive. The 32-year-old Dutchman has finished fourth in the Giro and the Vuelta before amid a series of good results, but has never managed a Grand Tour podium. Is this finally his year?

Thibaut Pinot (Groupama-FDJ) – Deficit: One minute 50 seconds

Pinot looked to be out of it after being one of a number of contenders to concede 100 seconds to Thomas and Alaphilippe in the stage 10 crosswinds, but he was the star of the Pyrenees and has clawed back those deficits with some brilliant rides. His victory on the Tourmalet was followed by his attacks on the Prat d’Albis, the two rides combined enough to see him gain one minute 32 seconds on Alaphilippe and one minute 41 seconds on Thomas in the space of 48 hours. Given his show of strength and questions over the others, the man in fourth could be the one to finally end a 34-year wait for a home winner.

Egan Bernal (Team Ineos) – Deficit: Two minutes two seconds

Thomas’ 22-year-old team-mate has the young rider classification pretty much sewn up with a 12-minute advantage over Pinot’s domestique David Gaudu, but what are the Colombian’s chances of upgrading white to yellow? The high Alpine stages to come should suit a rider born and raised at altitude so Ineos may have a decision to make very soon. Thomas suggested their status as co-leaders left him between “a rock and a hard place” on stage 15, claiming he had the legs to attack but did not want to help rivals catch Bernal. Ineos must play their cards smartly.

Emanuel Buchmann (Bora-Hansgrohe) – Deficit: Two minutes 14 seconds

Buchmann made giant strides forward in the Pyrenees, fourth on both the Tourmalet and Prat d’Albis as several other contenders fell by the wayside. The 26-year-old German remains the outsider of all those bunched together at the top of the standings, insisting his goal here is a first career top 10 in a Grand Tour, but the way he is riding he should not be discounted.

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Alaphilippe and Pinot hoping to end 34-year wait for home champion at Tour de France

Matt Jones 22/07/2019
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As the peloton swaps the fresh yet constricting air of the Pyrenees for the Alps, the chests of French cycling enthusiasts might also be getting a little bit tighter this week.

Hearts will be beating that little bit faster among both the riders and intrepid – some would say rabid – supporters iconically placed along the roadside of the Tour de France as the race heads into the penultimate stages.

For the riders this is because the end is in sight, but so are the ominous heights of the Alps. There are three mountain stages in a row from July 25-27 to come, three of the Tour’s final four days, with two of them – Tignes and Val Thorens – also tumultuous mountain-top finishes.

For the fans, meanwhile, though they may not be pushing their bodies to the limit in quite the same way, nerves are frayed and hearts thumping nervously. Particularly those fragile French hearts who feel that maybe, just maybe, nearly four decades of hurt is coming to an end.

For 34 years cycling’s greatest spectacle – indeed one of sport’s greatest – has not had a champion of its own. The Tour de France remains the most exciting, gruelling and amazing event sport has to offer. And yet it has lost some of its own identity in the barren years since Bernard Hinault lifted the last of his five titles in 1985.

Le Tour has been won by 23 French riders in all, between them taking 36 wins. Both are records. To put that in context the next three countries with most success – Belgium, Spain and Italy – have produced 18, 12 and 10 champions respectively, just four more than France’s total of 36.

Julian Alaphilippe is defying the odds in a bid to become the Tour de France's first home champion in 36 years.

Julian Alaphilippe is defying the odds in a bid to become the Tour de France’s first home champion in 36 years.

And yet, 34 years have passed since one of their own was enveloped by yellow at the final finish line.

In that time the two other Grand Tour races – the Giro d’Italia and Vuelta a Espana – have produced a total of 25 home winners; the Giro 14 and La Vuelta 11.

As for Le Tour, winners over the last 36 years have come from Britain, the United States, Germany, Italy, Spain, Australia, Ireland, Denmark – even Luxembourg.

Laurent Fignon is the closest France has come to ascending to the No1 spot on the podium since Hinault reached such heights. He agonisingly finished just eight seconds adrift of American Greg LeMond in 1989, the Californian powering to three titles in five years.

And yet there appears something special about this year’s race – one that has been so open from the start and that some say has been designed by organisers to finally deliver a home champion.

Whether this is the case or not, a flurry of Frenchman have certainly risen to the occasion on what is the 100th anniversary of the leader’s yellow jersey being introduced to the race.

Among the peaks and high altitude, Deceuninck-Quick-Step’s Julian Alaphilippe has been a breath of fresh air. Although not deemed a mountains specialist the Saint-Amand-Montrond man has adorned yellow for 11 of the 15 stages so far, and the last eight straight, winning two individual stages – as well as finishing an impressive second to compatriot Thibaut Pinot atop the Col du Tourmalet on Saturday’s Stage 14 in the perilous Pyrenees. He was also sixth behind winner Dylan Teuns on Stage 6, the inaugural mountain stage.

A puncheur by trade – someone who specialises in rolling terrain with short, steep climbs – overall Tour de France glory would normally seem beyond Alaphilippe.

He showed his first signs of cracking on Stage 15, finishing 11th and seeing his advantage over Simon Yates, Pinot, Mikel Landa, Egan Bernal, Geraint Thomas, Steven Kruijswijk and Alejandro Valverde eroded.

But there is something distinctly abnormal about the 27-year-old’s stubborn pursuit of the title. He is continuing to hang tough with the mountain men who litter the General Classification’s top 10 – like reigning champion Thomas and Pinot. Alaphilippe is the only one who isn’t an expert climber or a noted all-rounder.

But he is in the form of his life, coming into this year’s race having claimed the Milan-San Remo, Strade Bianche and La Fleche Wallonne titles.

Pinot has burst into contention in recent days, helped by his terrific triumph on the iconic Tourmalet. He was second to Yates the following day, the Melisey man putting more time into his rivals as he shot up to fourth. He’s now 1’ 50” adrift of his fellow countryman’s lead and hopes have surely switched from a place on the podium (he was third in 2014) to overall glory.

As if to force home the French feel-good factor even more, Warren Barguil, Guillaume Martin, David Gaudu (second behind Bernal in the young rider category) and Romain Bardet – runner-up in 2016 and third the following year – are all placed inside the top 20.

After a flat stage in Nimes to gently ease the peloton back into proceedings on Tuesday following the second and final rest day, Stage 17 takes the race into the Alps at Gap, followed by treks to Valloire and the Col du Galibier which climbs to a breathtaking 2,642m on Stage 18.

Stage 19 takes the riders on another gruelling slog up the Col de l’Iseran – the Tour’s highest peak this year at 2,770m – towards Tignes.

The penultimate Stage 20, meanwhile, drags riders up to Val Thorens – famous for being Europe’s highest ski resort. Any one of the main protagonists failing to ascend its 2,365m summit will find themselves on a slippery slope down the standings.

Pinot seems to be peaking at the right time and appears the strongest climber right now, but former soldier Alaphilippe is well drilled and will want to produce a final charge.

If either of them can provide a fruitful finish, France will flip.

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