Tour de France 2019 in numbers including 15 different stage winners and four yellow jersey wearers

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Egan Bernal wrapped up Tour de France victory when he cycled down the Champs-Elysees on Sunday.

Here, PA takes a look at the race in numbers.

2 – days in yellow for Bernal, the fewest of any winner since Cadel Evans took the jersey on the penultimate stage in 2011.

14 – Days in yellow for Julian Alaphilippe, whose remarkable and unexpected run changed the way the Tour was raced.

4 – Different riders to wear yellow in the Tour. Alaphilippe took it off the shoulders of Mike Teunissen on Stage 3 and lent it to Giulio Ciccone for 48 hours after Stage 6, before Bernal took over with two days to go.

0 – No stage winner was declared on the weather-shortened Stage 19 to Tignes, which means that although he is now a Tour winner, Bernal does not yet have a stage victory to his name.

Egan Bernal

15 – Different winners of the 19 stages in which an individual winner was named. Only Caleb Ewan, with three, and Alaphilippe and Simon Yates with two each claimed multiple wins.

4 – Stage wins for Jumbo-Visma, Lotto-Soudal and Mitchelton-Scott, the most by any of the teams.

40.44 – Bernal’s average speed in kilometres per hour, according to data captured by the tour’s official technology partner NTT.

101.5 – the highest speed recorded by NTT was 101.5kph, by Team Katusha-Alpecin’s Nils Politt during Stage 18.

316 – Peter Sagan’s haul in the points classification, substantially down on last year’s 477 but still comfortable enough, as he won the green jersey for a record seventh time – and seventh out of the last eight.

22 – Bernal is the youngest winner of the Tour in a century, and the third youngest winner in history, at 22 years and 196 days.

3,372 – distance in kilometres raced, with 37km cut from the end of Stage 19 and 71 taken off the start of Stage 20 due to adverse weather and landslides in the Alps.

91 – The gap in seconds between Bernal on the top step and Steven Kruijswijk in third. It is the smallest margin between those on spots the podium in the history of the Tour, beating the 122 seconds between Lucien Aimar and Raymond Poulidor in 1966.

60 – weight in kilograms of Bernal.

155 – riders to reach Paris, out of the 176 to start. Cofidis’ Nicolas Edet was the first to leave the race due to illness on Stage 6. Team Sunweb were the only team to lose more than two riders (Cees Bol, Wilco Kelderman and Soren Kragh Andersen) as the Tour saw the fewest dropouts in its history.

2,770 – metres of altitude at the summit of the Col de l’Iseran, the highest point of the race and one at which Bernal moved into yellow as bad weather forced the shortening of Stage 19.

10.2 – visitors, in millions, to the race centre on the Tour’s official website over the course of the three weeks.

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Tour de France 2019: Egan Bernal wraps up win for Team Ineos, creates history for Colombia

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Jonathan Castroviejo (l) and Geraint Thomas (r) congratulate Egan Bernal.

It was a moment to cherish for Egan Bernal on the road to Paris before Caleb Ewan won stage 21 of the Tour de France on the Champs-Elysees.

Australian Ewan came from well back in the pack to outsprint Dylan Groenewegen and collect his third stage win of the Tour as the sun set over the Arc de Triomphe at the end of the 130km stage from Rambouillet.

Just behind, Bernal crossed the line alongside team-mate and last year’s winner Geraint Thomas to secure his first Grand Tour victory in only his second career three-week race.

Bernal, who took the yellow jersey on Friday’s weather-shortened stage 19 in the Alps, becomes the first Colombian winner of the Tour and, at 22 years 196 days, the youngest winner in more than a century.

Thomas collected second place to give Britain a 10th podium finish in the history of the race, while Jumbo-Visma’s Steven Kruijswijk secured third place.

Colombia's Egan Bernal.

Colombia’s Egan Bernal.

As the traditional procession into Paris began from Rambouillet to the west of the city, Bernal was congratulated first by Julian Alaphilippe, who animated the 106th Tour as his aggressive start and dogged defence was rewarded by 14 days in the yellow jersey and, it was announced on Sunday, the Super Combatif award for the most aggressive rider.

Celebrations started from the Ineos team car with Bora-Hansgrohe’s Peter Sagan – who won the green jersey for a record seventh time – doing his best to photobomb.

Bernal’s victory continues a remarkable run of success for Sir Dave Brailsford’s team, who have now won seven of the last eight Tours and – including the 2011 Vuelta a Espana title awarded to Chris Froome earlier this month following Juan Jose Cobo’s doping case – 10 Grand Tours in all since their formation in 2010.

For once Brailsford’s team did not dominate a Tour which will be remembered for Alaphilippe’s remarkable run in yellow, but they were always next in line for when the Frenchman did – as expected – finally crack in the Alps.

Although Thomas had been best placed to take over for much of the race, Bernal made moves in the Pyrenees to take back time he had lost in the time trial, and then had the best legs in the Alps when it really mattered.

He took yellow on Friday’s weather-shortened stage 19, having attacked on the climb of the Col de l’Iseran, the highest point on the Tour. Sir Jim Ratcliffe, whose buyout of what was Team Sky earlier this year secured the team’s future, was watching on the from the team car as Bernal celebrated victory.

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Success part of Team Ineos’ present and past. But in Egan Bernal they are also investing in the future

Matt Jones 28/07/2019
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Geraint Thomas gives Egan Bernal a pat on the back as the Colombian all but sealed the Tour de France title.

The more things change, the more they stay the same. The late 19th Century French journalist and novelist Jean-Baptiste Alphonse Karr is credited with penning this epigram and it serves as an apt method with which to wrap up the 2019 Tour de France.

Things change: Egan Bernal, at 22, became the youngest Tour de France champion in 110 years on Sunday, and the first from Colombia.

Things stay the same: and yet, Team Ineos rode to yet another success at cycling’s most lauded event – Bernal’s triumph a seventh year in the last eight a rider wearing Ineos (Team Sky) colours has captured the famed yellow jersey.

Ineos’ grip on, nay, obsession with Le Tour is fascinating. Other teams may be enjoying success – Deceuninck Quick-Step’s number of victories over the last two years is bordering on the ridiculous, while rookie ventures UAE Team Emirates and Bahrain-Merida are making quiet strides.

But Ineos’ thirst for glory and continued pursuit of excellence on cycling’s grandest stage is deservedly keeping the spotlight focused on them.

Even ahead of this year’s race, an out of form and injured Geraint Thomas was seen as the favourite to retain the crown he took from Chris Froome last year. The Welshman hardly shone as he did 12 months earlier, yet he was still more than good enough to be among the leaders throughout.

Eventually finishing runner-up to team-mate Bernal, just 1’ 11” adrift, with the likes of Steven Kruijswijk, Emanuel Buchmann, Julian Alaphilippe, Mikel Landa and Rigoberto Uran not quite able to do enough to give Ineos a thorough inspection.

Bernal was seen as a pre-race favourite – for the young rider’s white jersey, not the yellow. Of the 176 participants from the 22 teams that took to the start line in Brussels on July 6, Bernal was the second youngest – only UAE Team Emirates’ burgeoning Belgian Jasper Philipsen, 21, his junior.

Coming into the race a bright future was being discussed. That future already appears to be here.

He was sort of thrust into the limelight following Froome’s horrific Tour-ending crash in training – which left him with multiple broken bones including a fractured neck, right femur, a broken hip and fractured ribs – while Thomas was lucky to escape serious injury in a crash during Stage 4 at the Tour de Suisse, ending his participation. Both occurred in June, just weeks before the Tour.

Yet, team principal Dave Brailsford had no hesitation in naming Bernal co-leader alongside the reigning champion – perhaps acutely aware that he was ready for the biggest of steps up.

Thomas, who despite admitting to never being at his best during the last month, will feel bitterly disappointed inside at getting so close and being so far away from retaining his title.

And yet, he essentially seemed to willingly fall in line to help his younger Colombian colleague secure the overall – and ultimate – race lead on the shortened penultimate stage to Val Thorens on Saturday.

Success is part of Ineos’ present and past. But in Bernal they are also investing in the future. Never satisfied with what they have they are always seeking to improve and extend their Tour de France legacy, even if Bernal’s ascension to the throne came quicker than expected.

Team-mates Thomas and Froome – winners of the last four Tours and five of the previous six – might be considered at the top of the slope and on their way down the mountains that have been their careers.

Bernal, meanwhile, is at the foot of what could prove a steep and prolonged incline.

Just think, 2019 Giro d’Italia winner Richard Carapaz is set to join them next season. With rumours a two-year contract for the Ecuadorian to move from Movistar to join his fellow South American Bernal is to be announced on August 1, Ineos are making inroads into the future with Thomas, 33, and Froome, 34, entering their twilight.

An exhausted Alaphilippe saw his feint hopes ended on Stage 20.

An exhausted Alaphilippe saw his faint hopes ended on Stage 20.

Imagine an Ineos line-up for the 2020 Tour consisting of all four – the last three champions as well as 26-year-old Giro king, Carapaz. Sure, the debate of team leaders would cause havoc and generate headlines galore. But it would be almost impossible to see anyone beyond them coming out on top once more.

For all this talk of Ineos’ success and stranglehold on cycling’s signature race, it would be remiss of us not to mention another rider.

A thought, or several, must be spared for Alaphilippe – the home hope who wore yellow for 14 of the 2019 Tour’s 21 stages. Who seemed for so long like he might just end 34 years of hurt for the host nation, who hadn’t seen one of their own clamber atop the No1 spot on the podium in Paris since Bernard Hinault won the fifth and final of his Tour titles in 1985.

Alaphilippe deserves plenty of praise for his phenomenal efforts in remaining with the mountain men for most of the race – especially through the torturous Pyrenees and Alps.

Still, even with the career year he is having, he did not possess the reserves to rip away Ineos’ grip on the magnificent maillot jaune.

For Alaphilippe, Quick-Step and indeed the rest of the riders and teams, they all face a struggle to keep up with the pace being set by Ineos.

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