Former champion Maria Sharapova earns winning start in Western & Southern Open

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Former champion Maria Sharapova defeated fellow wild card Alison Riske 6-3 7-6 (4) in the opening round of the Western & Southern Open in Cincinnati.

It was the first outing in Ohio for the Russian in five years and a single break at 4-3 helped Sharapova wrap up the first set inside 46 minutes.

The second set saw more to-and-fro, with Riske, the world number 37, breaking for a 3-0 lead before missing the chance to go 5-2 up as Sharapova battled back.

The 2011 winner failed to convert a break and match point at 6-5 but converted her third match point in the tie-break to book her place in the second round where she will face number one seed Ash Barty.

Former world number one Caroline Wozniacki fell at the first hurdle, going down 6-4 6-4 to Dayana Yastremska in just over 90 minutes, while Venus Williams also booked her place in the second round with a 7-5 6-2 win over American qualifier Lauren Davis.

Johanna Konta, seeded 14th, lost to Swedish qualifier Rebecca Peterson 6-3 3-6 7-5, wild card Svetlana Kuznetsova beat Anastasija Sevastova 7-6 (3) 6-7 (4) 6-4, Iga Swiatek beat Caroline Garcia 7-6 (1) 6-1 and world number nine Aryna Sabalenka made light work of Petra Martic 6-1 6-4.

Also through to the second round are Maria Sakkari who saw off Camila Giorgi 6-3 6-0 in just over an hour, Veronika Kudermetova who beat Bernarda Pera 6-2 6-3, and Elise Mertens who defeated Caty McNally 7-5 6-0.

Completing the picture are Yulia Putintseva who spent nearly two and a half hours on court to defeat Jelena Ostapenko 6-2 7-6 (3) 6-3 and Aliaksandra Sasnovich who beat Australian qualifier Astra Sharma 6-1 4-6 6-1.

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Andy Murray announces reunion with brother Jamie at next week's Citi Open in Washington

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Andy Murray is excited to be reunited on court with his brother Jamie after announcing they will team up together in the doubles at next week’s Citi Open in Washington.

The former world number one has so far been restricted to doubles action since returning to the game following his hip resurfacing operation in January, winning his first tournament back at Queen’s in June before suffering early exits at Eastbourne and Wimbledon.

After his loss at the All England Club, where he also played mixed doubles with Serena Williams, Andy ruled out the prospect of attempting to make a singles return during the American hard court season and said he was unsure whether he would carry on playing doubles or focus his training towards singles action.

But the 32-year-old has opted for the former and will play with his brother in the Citi Open, which starts next Monday.

“I am going to be competing in Washington next week in the doubles with my brother Jamie,” he said on a video posted to Twitter.

“I am very excited to be on the court with him and go back to Washington, it is a city I have always enjoyed visiting.

“It should be fun and I am hoping to have a good summer over in the states, keep progressing physically and hopefully get on the singles court soon.”

The Murray brothers last played together at the Rio Olympics, but were a prolific partnership during Great Britain’s 2015 Davis Cup victory, while they have won two ATP Tour titles together, in Tokyo in 2011 and Valencia the year before.

Jamie is the defending champion at Washington, having won the tournament last year with Bruno Soares.

It is perhaps a bit of a surprise that Andy is opting to return to Washington after last year’s tournament director, Keely O’Brien, criticised him.

In the early stages of a comeback from his first round of hip surgery, he had been left in tears after winning a marathon battle with Marius Copil that ended at 3am local time and said afterwards he did not know whether he would play his next match.

He ended up withdrawing from the tournament, by which time O’Brien had told the Washington Post: “I hope that Andy really takes into consideration this role in his sport, and as a global role model to guys and girls on the tour and kids around the world that, when things are difficult and tough and the conditions aren’t great, it’s not OK to just give up.”

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Novak Djokovic battles past Roger Federer in longest Wimbledon final in history

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Novak Djokovic battled past Roger Federer in the longest Wimbledon final in history to match Bjorn Borg by winning his fifth title.

In one of the most dramatic matches the All England Club has ever witnessed, Djokovic defied a crowd screaming for his opponent by becoming the first player to win a singles match on a deciding tie-break.

Djokovic had saved two match points when Federer served for victory at 8-7 in the deciding set and went on to take it 7-6 (5) 1-6 7-6 (4) 4-6 13-12 (3) after four hours and 57 minutes.

Federer had hoped to follow up his emotional semi-final victory over Rafael Nadal by completing the double over his other great rival for the first time at a grand slam and fought back well having twice been a set down but this will be one of his most painful losses.

Djokovic has now won four out of the last five major tournaments, taking his overall tally to 16 and making Federer’s record of 20 seem ever more within reach.

The historical importance was a key theme of this final, with 37-year-old Federer staring at perhaps his last chance to put further distance between himself and his younger rivals.

Nadal is only two adrift and showing no sign of letting his iron grip on the French Open slip, while Djokovic has been open about the fact he is playing for history.

That perhaps played a part in this strange match, which rarely hit the heights in terms of sustained quality yet had enough plot twists for a feature-length thriller, even before its extraordinary deciding set.

Federer was the better player for all of the first four sets, with Djokovic’s game strangely off colour apart from his serve, but played two poor tie-breaks either side of a set that his opponent barely turned up for.

The fifth set was scarcely describable, finally ending in the 25th game when Federer, who had been chasing a ninth title, framed a forehand into the crowd.

The tie-break at 12-12 was introduced following last year’s epic semi-final between John Isner and Kevin Anderson yet had not been used in a singles match until this contest.

After 47 previous matches, 25 of them won by Djokovic, there were no secrets between these two and the first set was fascinating to watch as Federer sought to take his opponent out of his baseline comfort zone.

Federer, who had not beaten his rival since 2015, used the short backhand slice to pull Djokovic forward, mixed up the pace and threw in a number of drop shots.

He had a break point in the third game, and was two points from the set at 4-5, 0-30 but could not take either chance.

Errors then cost Federer after he turned a 1-3 deficit in the tie-break into a 5-3 lead, a mistimed backhand dropping into the tramlines on Djokovic’s first set point.

It must have been a painful set to lose for the Swiss but in double-quick time he was level at one-set all after an uncharacteristic mental lapse from his opponent.

A slip behind the baseline in the opening game perhaps unsettled Djokovic, who appeared to decide not to expend any unnecessary energy after going two breaks behind.

The most unexpected factor was how poorly Djokovic was returning but he somehow stayed with Federer through the third set.

He created one set point in the 10th game with a glorious half-volley but Djokovic’s serve – the one part of his game that was working well – bailed him out.

The Serbian was beginning to look very frustrated but he forced another tie-break and again it was Federer who unexpectedly crumbled.

Given Federer had never won a five-set match against Djokovic, that left him with a serious mountain to climb, but, just when it seemed he might finally be taking control, his level dropped again and Federer surged into a 5-2 lead.

Djokovic finally forced a break point, and converted it, to give himself a chance of rescuing the situation but Federer served out the set at the second opportunity, the partisan crowd roaring their approval.

History still said Djokovic was the favourite and, after Federer saved three break points in the third game of the decider, he made the breakthrough to lead 4-2.

But he could not cement it and on the match went, the tension growing with each point.

Djokovic was in trouble at 5-5, 15-30 but produced a diving volley winner, then Federer was two points from defeat three times in the next game but held on.

Federer, who turns 38 next month, looked to have made the crucial breakthrough when a forehand pass gave him an 8-7 lead and the chance to serve for the match.

His serve carried him to 40-15 but he netted a routine forehand on the first chance and was then passed by Djokovic, who went on to break back.

The world number one saved two more break points at 11-11 and that proved to be Federer’s final chance as Djokovic surged ahead in the tie-break and this time there was no way back.

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