RWC 2019: Simon Easterby believes James Ryan will become an Ireland great

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • Mail
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • WhatsApp
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn

James Ryan’s rare mix of humility and talent marks him out as a future Ireland great, according to Simon Easterby.

Fast-rising lock Ryan faces the biggest game of his embryonic Test career on Saturday when Ireland take on Samoa bidding to secure a World Cup quarter-final spot.

The 23-year-old has Leinster team-mate Dan Leavy to thank for the tongue-in-cheek nickname of ‘Big Cheese’, but forwards coach Easterby explains that in reality Ryan is as far away as possible from any ‘Big I Am’ persona.

Ryan is already being touted as a future Ireland captain, but Easterby backed the 21-cap second row to carve out a Test career of true renown whether he leads his country or not.

“He comes across as being quite quiet but actually he’s a real student of the game,” Easterby said.

“He works incredibly hard on the physical element, but certainly the mental part of the game too. There’s no ‘Big I Am’ about him, even though his nickname would suggest otherwise.

“He’s just a guy who will continue to grow and will continue to lead, whether that’s through having a ‘C’ next to his name or just through his actions.

“He will become one of the greats, I’ve no doubts about that.”

Ryan made his Test debut even before his senior bow with Leinster, such was Ireland’s faith in their fast-maturing lock.

The sharp-witted youngster came off the bench in Ireland’s 55-19 win over the United States in Harrison on June 10, 2017, and has stormed from strength to strength ever since.

“He’s come through the ranks, hasn’t he? We plucked him, I don’t think he’d even played a senior game for Leinster when we took him to the States to make his debut,” Easterby said.

“Maybe there were a few eyebrows raised at that. But he hasn’t disappointed.

“He’s a phenomenal athlete. He’s certainly on the right track currently. He works incredibly hard.

“And that I guess is the baseline for any great player: that they have the raw talent and the ability but that they also work incredibly hard. And he has all three.”

Provided by Press Association Sport

Recommended

Most popular

RWC 2019: Cobus Reinach scores hat-trick as Springboks seal place in quarter-finals

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • Mail
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • WhatsApp
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn

South Africa secured their place in the World Cup quarter-finals with an emphatic 66-7 victory over 14-man Canada in Kobe.

Canada, who conceded 48 points to Italy and 63 to New Zealand in their opening matches, again found the going tough in Pool B as they shipped 10 tries to the dominant Springboks.

Northampton’s Cobus Reinach helped himself to a hat-trick in the opening 20 minutes while influential fly-half Elton Jantjies kicked his way to 16 points.

Canada, who trailed 47-0 at the break, also had to play more than half the game with a man less after Josh Larsen was sent off for a shoulder charge into the head of Thomas Du Toit.

South Africa made 13 changes for the game but there was no problem with their cohesion as they raced in front with a try after just two minutes.

Damien De Allende, one of only two players retained in the starting line-up, profited from a break by RG Snyman to touch down and within three minutes S’busiso Nikosi went over in the corner for the second.

Reniach claimed his first after nine minutes as he gathered his own kick to cross and grabbed another following more powerful running by Snyman. He then sprinted half the length of the field to claim his third and South Africa scored again when Warrick Gelant weaved his way through the Canucks defence.

Canada’s night got even worse when Larsen was sent off before the break following a foul play review by the TMO and they were breached again when Frans Steyn crashed over from close range.

The Springboks made a slow start to the second half and Canada registered a consolation when Jeff Hassler drove to the line and Matt Heaton forced his way over.

Normal service was soon resumed, however, as veteran hooker Schalk Brits claimed a well-worked try and Damian Willemse – only recently drafted into the squad as an injury replacement – went over from a scrum.

Frans Malherbe powered through the defence for South Africa’s 10th try eight minutes from time.

Provided by Press Association Sport

Most popular

RWC 2019: Joey Carbery eager to repay Ireland faith after recovering from injury

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • Mail
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • WhatsApp
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn

Joey Carbery has declared himself finally fully fit and ready to repay Ireland’s faith for taking him to the World Cup when carrying an ankle injury.

The Munster fly-half revealed training fully and without impediment on Tuesday was a “huge confidence boost” ahead of Saturday’s Pool A decider against Samoa in Fukuoka.

Carbery almost missed the World Cup with the ankle ligament injury he suffered in August’s victory over Italy in Dublin, but was backed by boss Joe Schmidt to shake off that blow while out in Japan.

The 23-year-old came off the bench in the 19-12 loss to the host nation but then aggravated his ankle issue and was a late withdrawal from the bonus-point win over Russia.

But now the former Leinster playmaker insists he is ready to strike back to top form, admitting it is time to pay back Ireland’s coaches for bringing him to the World Cup in the first place.

“Hopefully I’m 100 per cent now, it has been quite a frustrating year with injuries,” said Carbery.

“But I’m fully back now and feel back to myself as I was. So that’s a huge confidence boost for me and I suppose I can just get back out there and do what I’ve been doing.

“I suppose with the timing of the injury just before we left for Japan, and the nature of it as well, it was always going to be a bit of a frustration.

“But to be honest I was lucky enough even to be considered and that I did enough to get on the plane.

“The coaches showed a lot of faith in me and I’m very grateful for it.

“I want to repay that faith now. I want to go out and do the job and show them that they weren’t wrong; that’s definitely in the back of my mind.”

Regular fly-half Carbery was due to cover scrum-half from the bench for the Russia clash, but pulled out late on due to a minor recurrence of that ankle concern.

Ireland subdued the Russians 35-0 in Kobe to set up a group decider against Samoa, where another bonus-point victory will secure their qualification for the quarter-finals.

Carbery explained his latest ankle niggle was never anything serious, but enough of a problem to prove an unwanted distraction.

“I had a little bit of a setback last week which was frustrating,” he said.

“But I’m feeling really good this week, it was nothing major last week, so I’m in a good spot.

“The ankle just took a bang, nothing more than that. That just made the joint all sticky, there was nothing serious at all it just needed a couple of days to settle down.

“So it was obviously annoying to miss out on game time but thankfully it was nothing serious.”

Carbery kicked the ball to touch to signal the end of last month’s shock 19-12 loss to Japan in Shizuoka.

The New Zealand-born playmaker still believes he made the right decision in opting to protect Ireland’s losing bonus point, which could yet prove crucial in the qualification race for the quarter-finals.

“I knew we had the bonus-point secured and there wasn’t too much on for us, so at the time I thought the best thing would be to kick it out,” said Carbery.

“And yes, I think that was the right call. I didn’t want to do anything silly as well: maybe they could have got the ball back and taken the bonus-point away from us.”

Provided by Press Association Sport

Most popular