New footage shows Ireland prop Cian Healey's 'king-hit' that broke Will Genia's arm in Wallabies leveller

Alex Broun 19/06/2018
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Will Genia is out of the third Test with a broken arm

New footage has emerged that shows Cian Healy’s ‘king-hit’ that left Wallabies scrum-half Will Genia with a broken arm during Ireland’s 26-21 second Test victory in Melbourne on Saturday.

Wallabies coach Michael Cheika was seething after the incident in the 25th-minute that ruled the Melbourne Rebels scrumhalf out of the third and deciding Test in Sydney this weekend.

Genia will undergo surgery on the injury on Sunday but should be fit for the Rugby Championship, while Healy himself is also in doubt for this weekend after sustaining a shoulder injury early in the second-half.

“We ran the play down the front and Willy’s (Genia) the decoy around the back and he got king hit from the side,” said Cheika, “looked like a shoulder – and when you’re not expecting it that’s what happens.”

“So Hoops (Michael Hooper) went down the front, Willy ran around the back – I’m not sure who it was from the other team that came in and hit him – and he jammed his arm and broke it.”

Despite Cheika’s strong comments the game’s citing commissioner Mike O’Leary decided not to cite Healy.

Now footage has emerged of the incident in question, which shows that contact between Healy and the Wallabies scrum-half does occur. (see below)

Judge for yourself whether any further action should have been taken.

NSW No9 Nick Phipps is expected to start this Saturday in place of Genia.

Ireland bounced back from their opening defeat to level the series at AAMI Park and travel to Sydney for next Saturday’s decider with momentum behind them.

Ireland coach Joe Schmidt was upbeat about the prospects of Andrew Conway (hip), Dan Leavy (sternum) and Healy’s capacity to recover in time for the final Test.

Although a series win is the primary goal, Schmidt is intent on continuing his rotation policy with next year’s World Cup in mind.

“We definitely want to win the series, but we’ve probably got 10 games now between this tour and when we go into our warm-up to the World Cup,” said Schmidt.

“The thing that we want to believe about our squad is that there’s less and less between players, and so selection is a contest every time.”

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Argentina coach Daniel Hourcade resigns after shock series loss to Wales

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Daniel Hourcade has called time on his Argentina coaching career

Argentina coach Daniel Hourcade has announced his shock resignation following successive defeats to Wales.

Hourcade said he was stepping down after the Pumas’ 30-12 loss in Santa Fe on Saturday which extended their dismal recent record to two wins in 17 games.

Overall Hourcade has a record of just 15 wins from 53 matches (28.3%) in charge since November 2013 but four of those matches came at the 2015 Rugby World Cup where the Pumas reached the semi-finals after a shock 43-20 victory over Ireland in the quarter-finals in Cardiff.

“The players aren’t responding,” Hourcade said after the game. “The responsibility is mine. The cycle is complete.”

The 60-year-old’s last game in charge will be against Scotland this weekend, who have problems themselves after a one-point defeat to the United States.

The Pumas 2-0 defeat to Wales handed the tourists their first series victory in Argentina since 1999.

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England coach Eddie Jones still defiant after six straight defeat

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Eddie Jones insists he is pulling knives out of his back having anticipated the turbulent period currently engulfing his England reign.

South Africa have seized an unassailable 2-0 lead in their series with Saturday’s final encounter in Cape Town remaining to leave Jones fighting for his future in the wake of five successive Test defeats.

The Rugby Football Union has given its backing to their head coach and there are no plans to reconsider his contract, which expires in 2023 subject to a break clause dependent on performance at next year’s World Cup.

England have plunged to sixth in the global rankings on the back of Saturday’s 23-12 defeat in Bloemfontein, but Jones sounded a note of defiance by revealing the sense of fulfilment he feels from leading a team out of crisis.

“Every coaching job is the same,” he said.

“When you are doing well, everyone pats you on the back and when you are not doing well, you’re pulling knives out of your back. That’s the reality of it.

“I’ve been through it before many times. If you coach for a long period of time you have your good periods and your bad periods. These are the great periods.

“These are the periods you look forward to – where everyone thinks you’re done and you have to find a way to win. I’m enjoying it, loving it, absolutely loving it.

“What can I do? The only thing I can do is coach well. Anything else, I don’t control. I just try to coach the team better every day and that’s where my enjoyment comes.

“That’s what I love doing. I love coaching this team. If someone decides that’s not good enough, then they decide.

“If someone decides I’m good enough then I will keep coaching. That’s what I’ve done with every team I’ve coached and it’s no different now.”

Jones has faced a tsunami of criticism following South Africa’s comfortable victory at Free State Stadium on Saturday, including some calls to step down.

Memories of the opening two years of his reign when he oversaw a world record-equalling 18th successive Test victory and then 24 wins from 25 matches are fading fast, but the Australian was prepare for this very scenario.

“I knew this was coming, 100 per cent. You can’t expect to just keep winning endlessly. And a lot of the wins we had, luck went on our side,” Jones said.

“You get that, then you have these other periods which are bloody tough when you don’t get any luck. You don’t get those 50-50 calls.

“And you’ve got to battle through them. Because that gives you the hallmarks of what you need. It builds resilience, it builds the character of your team, it builds memories.

“They remember these things for a long period of time. It draws people closer together. And what you get out of this is a stronger team. And that’s what will happen.”

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