Lack of speed leaves UAE trailing in opponents' wake

Matt Jones 22/05/2017
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Apollo Perelini.

Euphoria was the overriding emotion 12 months ago. The UAE had just won their first-ever title as a fully-fledged rugby nation, strung together the longest unbeaten run in their brief history and earned promotion to Asia Rugby’s second tier.

Now, that fulfilling experience has been removed and all that is left is a feeling of emptiness. Apollo Perelini, his coaching staff and players must head back to the drawing board after a thoroughly wretched 2017 Asia Rugby Championship in which they followed three straight triumphs with three straight defeats.

Their campaign was blighted by a series of bad luck and bad judgement. Bullocking Number 8 Jaen Botes suffered concussion and broke his hand in the opening game, lively full-back Dan Bell broke his ankle, while Ryno Fourie missed the Sri Lanka game after being cited.

Hooker Josh Ives was extremely unfortunate to be sent off in that second game, which left the UAE with their backs against the wall to get anything out of the game, as well as with threadbare squad for the decider against the Philippines.

But the UAE’s discipline was sorely lacking throughout the tournament. At half time in their final game, they’d conceded 11 penalties. Against Sri Lanka there were 12 in the opening 40 minutes. Stats that are far too frequent to be a success at international level.

Handling errors were to be expected in the humid surroundings of the Far East, but they became a staple part of the UAE’s play as attacks constantly broke down.

And, inevitably, when they did concede possession, they were punished ruthlessly by the cunning and quickness their opponents possessed.

Above all else, pace was the biggest area in which the UAE were found wanting. All three opponents had rapid backs and devastating finishers who could score from anywhere on the field.

Malaysia’s marauding Fijian centre Jone Nasalo was their chief tormentor in game one, scoring a hat-trick. Fleet-footed Sri Lanka full-back Thilina Wijesinghe was the architect of their second defeat to the Brave Elephants.

And despite finding a more common ground against similar opponents in the Philippines and their powerful pack, the Volcanoes still possessed livewire backs Kevin Gordon, Justin Coveney and Patrice Olivier who could erupt at any moment.

Imad Reyal (l) was not part of the UAE squad in Ipoh

Imad Reyal (c) was not part of the UAE squad in Ipoh

The UAE squad was packed full of talent from the UAE Premiership. It was the best assembled in years. Yet genuine pace was lacking. Only darting Jebel Ali Dragons full-back/winger Fourie offered a genuine speed threat from deep – scoring two of their seven tries.

It was curious to see clubmate Imad Reyal omitted. The Sri Lankan-born full-back was part of the training squad but perhaps he was injured or simply overlooked, in favour of size.

A year ago, Dubai Exiles’ Charlie Sargent would have been a shoe-in for a place on the plane. Yet, much like Exiles 2016/17 campaign, the young flyer has failed to fizz, struggling for form and with injury.

Dubai Hurricanes’ Ian Overton, part of past UAE squads, was also left at home after a stop-start season.

Perelini has plenty of talented players at his disposal. Several will perhaps depart over the summer, but more will become available next year.

A year ago he bemoaned the lack of depth in his backs. And while the likes of Luke Stevenson, Kris Greene, Andy Powell and Sean Carey are welcome additions, in 2018 he must find some more finishers and pick a squad with greater balance.

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Perelini urges his UAE stars to learn from tough ARC lesson

Matt Jones 22/05/2017
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Apollo Perelini.

The UAE have learnt some harsh lessons from their 2017 Asia Rugby Championship and head coach Apollo Perelini insists the bitter disappointment will bode well for their future and that of the national team.

Perelini and his players had gone into the tournament dreaming of a second successive promotion into the ARC’s top three alongside South Korea and Hong Kong – there was even a sliver of a chance they could make the 2019 Rugby World Cup in Japan.

The hue of that dream was muddied from an opening 36-22 loss to hosts Malaysia and two subsequent defeats to Sri Lanka and the Philippines left the squad absolutely distraught.

Injuries and suspensions certainly did not aide their cause and they battled valiantly in every game and made every opponent work for their win.

But, ultimately, they fell short. And it is an experience Perelini hopes they learn from.

“It’s not a great feeling, it’s a horrible feeling and I’m not quite accustomed to losing. That’s rugby unfortunately,” the former dual code Samoa star said.

“We’ll have to get our heads up and look to what happens over the next year or so. Some of the best teams in the world go through these disappointments.

“I’ve been in this situation as a player and it always makes you a better player. And I hope these players will learn from this experience. I think these players will respect the game of rugby being played outside the UAE.”

A killer score in all three games proved body blows for the UAE in Ipoh. In their opener against the hosts they were camped on the Malaysia line inside the final 10 minutes before being penalised for early engagement at a scrum, a Sakiusa Gavidi try minutes later sealing their fate.

Against Sri Lanka they fought tooth and nail in a second half in which 30 minutes were spent playing with 14 men following hooker Josh Ives’ harsh sending off, with Jesan Dissanayake’s try 12 minutes from time again proving decisive.

And, against the Philippines, they clawed their back from 23-13 down to lead 26-23 with 11 minutes to go, only to fall foul of Patrice Olivier’s late score.

Every defeat had more to do with the UAE’s own shortcomings as they did the talent of their opponents. And Perelini again feels the tournament provides an eye-opener for the level they must get to in 2018.

“I’m extremely disappointed with the result (against the Philippines),” said Perelini, who can at least look forward to leading the UAE once again in Division I next year after they were spared relegation – due to Japan’s hosting of the World Cup.

“The frustrating thing was we always planned for a good start, but we haven’t started well the whole tournament and to be behind again from the start became a mental battle.

“I’m afraid the team didn’t quite stick to the game plan and the skill level let us down at times in crucial positions, as well as missed tackles. We didn’t handle the game plan. When we do we can score tries. We haven’t failed to score tries or put phases together.

“It’s just the lapses in concentration, the odd dropped ball. The adjustment to the paces was also another big factor.

“Talking to the boys, they realise now the level they have to be up to in fitness, skills, strength, it has to be higher than what they’re comfortable with at club level.

“When you’re stepping out against these teams, these players are big and powerful and skillful as well. It cost us today and cost us all week. It’s a learning curve.”

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Former Abu Dhabi Harlequins youngster McMillan Chiwawa aiming to shine at Amsterdam 7s

Matt Jones 20/05/2017
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McMillan Chiwawa in action for Harlequins v Bahrain in the 2014/15 season.

Former Abu Dhabi Harlequins prospect McMillan Chiwawa will be appearing at the Amsterdam 7s next weekend.

The talented winger, 23, left Quins last summer and is currently working hard in order to make it as a professional in Europe.

He’s featured heavily on the international sevens circuit over the last few years and will be in the Netherlands at the weekend for the tournament, which takes place from May 26-28, as part of the Ronin Headhunters.

The team was formed in York in 2001 by four British Army soldiers and has since competed in numerous UK-based events as well as enjoyed tours to Fiji, Dubai, Las Vegas as well as Amsterdam.

The make-up of the team this year has a cross Atlantic flavour with half the squad being sevens specialist players from the USA, joining forces with players from the UK, as well as Chiwawa.

The players will be going for gold in the men’s pier event and Chiwawa is excited to play.

“I’m really looking forward to playing in an elite competition in Amsterdam with internationals and pro players, I’m going there with eyes and ears open to learn from my teammates and coaching staff with more experience,” said  Zimbabwe-born Chiwawa, who scored six tries on his way to being named his Selects team’s MVP at the USA Sevens in Vegas last year.

The then 21-year-old was so impressive that he was approached by several scouts.

“Hopefully I can impress for another MVP title for personal achievements but for team achievements we all want to impress sponsors to expand team growth,” added Chiwawa, who revealed he has been back in his native Zimbabwe for the last 12 months working on a programme to send talented young players to former club Harlequins.

“I left Harlequins last summer and ever since I’ve started touch rugby in Zimbabwe and I’m working on a player pathway to send quality players to Harlequins so they can learn from the likes of Mike McFarlane, who’s a great coach, and the Quins boys are who an awesome bunch of players.

“At the moment I’m trying to crack pro in France but there’s always a possibility for a return to Harlequins. I’m grateful for what (chairman) Andy Cole has done for me and a special mention to Jeremy Manning (former Quins player-coach) who was a great mentor.”

Despite being away from the Emirates, Chiwawa has been keeping up with the national team’s exploits in Malaysia this week at the Asia Rugby Championships, and he is happy to see rugby on the up in the UAE.

“I see how UAE rugby is growing and games are now broadcasted so I’m proud to have represented the country while I was there in touch, sevens and rugby league,” he added.

Headhunters emerged from a new sportswear brand which was launched this year, based in Brunei. Their aim is to make money from sports kit with profits going towards growing the game of rugby in the region.

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