Elina Svitolina is a 'natural born fighter', says her coach Andrew Bettles

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Finishing on a high: Elina Svitolina.

Elina Svitolina’s coach Andrew Bettles believes her WTA Finals triumph could be a great launching pad for next season as the Ukrainian appears to have conquered her demons, sending out a major statement at the close of 2018.

Following a difficult second half of the year, Svitolina defied all odds by going undefeated at the season finale in Singapore, to win the biggest title of her career.

Scooping the Billie Jean King trophy not only silenced her doubters, but lifted Svitolina back into the world’s top-five (she ends the year as the world No. 4).

Svitolina was in a tight position before Singapore. She hadn’t secured her qualification spot and wasn’t entered in any tournaments in the last week leading up to the WTA Finals. Her fate was not in her own hands and she had to depend on other players’ results to book her place in Singapore. Ultimately results fell in her favour and she made it to the Lion City.

Her coach Bettles is not really sure how she pulled off the title victory after so much uncertainty just 10 days earlier.

“I can’t really [explain it],” Bettles told Sport360.

“I guess pressure was totally off her because she didn’t even know if she was going to play so she should just go out there, give it her best and she had nothing to lose.”

Svitolina, whose strong first half of the year saw her pick up titles in Brisbane, Dubai and Rome, spoke openly throughout the week in Singapore about how tough it was for her to deal with the slew of scrutiny and criticism regarding her dip in form and dramatic weight loss.

She felt she had something to prove and her WTA Finals success goes a long way to doing just that.

Her stats during the tournament painted an impressive picture as she led the field in aces and service points won.

“She’s a great player, she went through a little rough patch but that didn’t stop her from being an amazing player. So I think she just got back to her basics a little bit, kind of let all the bad feeling and everything out and she was just free to play and you could see what a great player she is,” explained Bettles.

“I think she’s naturally a born fighter, you could see it out there. A lot of people were doubting her over the summer, and probably even herself a little bit, so she went out there and showed everyone what she can do.”

In August, Svitolina parted ways with her then head coach Thierry Ascione. She had the briefest of trials with Nick Saviano in Wuhan but that partnership did not come into fruition.

Bettles, who started off as her hitting partner then became her traveling coach, has done a great job with Svitolina, helping her get through the aforementioned “rough patch” and was seen commended by the legendary Martina Navratilova, who greeted him after the final in Singapore.

A search for an additional coach will commence during the offseason.

“I’m going to have time off, obviously, I think three weeks. I have to settle some issues with my health,” said Svitolina. “Yeah, just go from there. I’m going to speak with Andy [Bettles] and see what are the best options, which coaches are available at the moment, and try to work for some time.

“It’s a little bit easier to work during the offseason, because obviously you’re not like under crazy pressure. It’s not the same as you start, for example, in the middle of the season you take someone. So that’s why it’s a bit tricky. So I have to really think — I don’t want to take, like, just a person and then, you know, split in two weeks. So it’s a big decision.”

Last year, Caroline Wozniacki lifted the WTA Finals trophy then went on to claim her first Grand Slam title in Australia at the start of the 2018 season. Can Svitolina use her Singapore triumph to a similar effect?

“Let’s hope so,” said Bettles.

“It’s a great thing to build on going into the offseason, so she’ll have a nice feeling going into that and she’ll be in great shape for Australia.”

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Kiki Bertens and coach Raemon Sluiter discuss her year of transformation

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In a WTA season of transformations, breakthroughs and surprises, Kiki Bertens checked every box and walks away from Singapore knowing she has plenty to be proud of.

The first Dutch woman to feature in the WTA Finals singles event since Brenda Schultz-McCarthy in 1997, Bertens made her top-10 debut earlier this month and finishes her year in a far different position to where she was 12 months ago – not just in the rankings, but more importantly in terms of headspace.

Last year, after losing the doubles final in Singapore with partner Johanna Larsson, Bertens contemplated retiring from the sport as she admittedly felt she was failing to find the joy in the sport. Her coach Raemon Sluiter suggested she think long and hard during her subsequent vacation in Bali on whether she believed she should continue playing, or if she was ready to walk away from tennis with no regrets.

Bertens, ranked 31 at the time, returned from her break with a sheet of paper that included a short list of things she needed to change in order to keep going. Sluiter was encouraged by the fact his charge was being proactive about her situation and decided to continue their working relationship, after previously considering parting ways with Bertens.


What followed was a remarkable tale of transformation that unfolded throughout the 2018 season and ended with Bertens winning the Most Improved Player of the Year award, before falling in three close sets to Elina Svitolina in the semis of the WTA Finals.









A formerly self-proclaimed clay specialist, Bertens, who won the Premier title in Charleston in April on green clay, made a stunning run to her first Premier 5 title on the hard courts of Cincinnati in August. She added a second hard-court trophy to her cabinet later in Seoul. On grass, she reached the quarter-finals of Wimbledon. She also reached finals on clay in Madrid and Gstaad.


Translating her success to all surfaces wasn’t the only standout outcome of Bertens’ efforts this year. The 26-year-old posted a tour-leading 12 top-10 victories throughout 2018 – a glaring sign that she developed further belief in her abilities against the very best.


“It’s been an incredible season. I can be really proud of myself,” said Bertens following her tight defeat to Svitolina in the Singapore semis.


“The only goal we set in the beginning of this year was just try to have more fun, and of course winning is more fun, so that makes it easier.


“But I think already like the first half-year it was great. I felt so much better. I felt so much better on court. Then my season was already, like, a good season. But especially now, like, winning three titles, being here in Singapore, being in top-10 of the world, it’s just all amazing, yeah.”


For Sluiter, the big achievement hasn’t necessarily been the results, but the fact that Bertens was willing to put in the work. In the past, he says she used to get easily derailed by one defeat, which would push her to stop training for several days, and sway her away from healthy eating habits


“It sounds maybe strange but the most fulfilling is the way she’s worked this year. Of course there’s still stuff to work on but the way she took the sport as a way of life is remarkable and that’s been a privilege to watch and an outcome of that are great results but to me, it’s even more about that,” Sluiter told Sport360.


Bertens credits minor adjustments to her life on tour for her progress this year and her overall positive feelings towards her profession.


“I think it’s just some small things. I’m just trying to not think about tennis too much. Like off-court, just doing some more fun stuff. Just walk around in the city. Just go for a coffee and do some yoga, as well,” she explains.


The unique format of the WTA Finals isn’t just about its elite top-eight field, it’s also about the challenge of the round robin stage, and how a defeat doesn’t spell the end of a player’s journey.


“I would say this tournament it’s almost like a few tournaments in one. Because you have the chance to lose a match and then two days later you play again which is sometimes possible when you’re in the semi-finals or finals of a tournament and then you play next week. It’s a very good format to test acceptance because you get new chances and see how many blows you can take and be back ready to fight. I knew already from Kiki that she can do that. Just still a little bit too hard on herself sometimes,” says Sluiter.




The ninth-ranked Bertens, who told Dutch press on Sunday that she is adding physio, hitting partner and coach Elise Tamaela (worked with Aleksandra Krunic this season) to her team in 2019, knows that next season will come with its own set of pressures, but she’s hopeful she can handle it in a positive manner.


Sluiter believes it’s better to take the pressure head on, rather than avoid it.


“The pressure will come. It’s utopia to think that pressure isn’t going to come. How are you going to deal with it, or how are you going to try to not let the pressure come? The pressure is going to come and there’s nothing wrong with that, you deal with it as good as possible and I think that’s what she’s done already this year,” he says.


“Especially the end of the year. It will probably feel good in a few days but she’ll still feel some bruises from the fact that she didn’t get to Singapore herself (she qualified only after world No. 1 Simona Halep pulled out with a back injury).


“Like I said, she’s really hard on herself and she can really stick to those things instead of the good things, so that’s going to be the challenge.


“And for me, attitude is going to be key there and that of course is more difficult when you get tired like here, when you are under pressure. But if you see the really, really good ones, the attitude always – Rafa [Nadal] of course is a prime example. And I think it’s a very good challenge to have, it will sometimes hurt for her and it will be tough for her but we have to approach it as a very, very nice challenge.”


Although she loves flying under the radar, rather than soak up the limelight, Bertens will have to accept that more eyes will be glued on her moving forward. WTA legend Chris Evert was asked if she believed Bertens could win a Grand Slam.


“Absolutely,” replied Evert, an 18-time major champion.


“After watching her this year, absolutely she could win a Grand Slam. Absolutely. Two years ago Kiki was inconsistent and not moving as well. She’s fitter now than she’s ever been. She’s hitting some big shots with consistency. It’s the attitude. I just see her feeling that she belongs in the top three or four in the world. She belongs here. So she’s gaining more and more confidence. It’s really that belief that has really propelled her and is going to propel her. It’s all up here (pointing to her head).”


Asked if he thinks Bertens feels like she belongs among the world’s top10, Sluiter said: “Yes, for sure, especially with the wins she had over top-10 players and the ranking doesn’t lie.


“I think if you ask her she’d say she feels like a top-20 or top-15 player and I think I can live with that. Because if we look at the field in Zhuhai, it’s crazy packed. If I would be a tennis fanatic – well I am, but I need my holiday and Zhuhai is quite far from the Netherlands – but it’s a great event.


“There are so many good players, everybody is capable of winning the tournament and I would go one step further that everybody is capable of winning this tournament if they are on a roll. If Julia Goerges is on a roll, if Daria [Kasatkina] is on a roll, if Aryna [Sabalenka], [Garbine] Muguruza, [Caroline] Garcia… it’s a really exciting place at the moment on the WTA tour.


“So I can live with the fact if she goes like top-20, because I think it is more or less a top-20, but then again I’m the coach and I’d say, ‘Hey, you’re No. 9 for a reason’.”




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Sloane Stephens pulls off brilliant comeback to set up Singapore final against Elina Svitolina

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Sloane Stephens and Elina Svitolina have been playing like they have something to prove all week in Singapore and they both enter the final undefeated and battle-tested.

Stephens is looking to win her biggest title since lifting the 2017 US Open while Svitolina is bidding to win the biggest trophy of her career, following a sub-par second half of the season.

The fifth-seeded Stephens came back from 0-6, 0-2 down against Karolina Pliskova in Saturday’s semi-final to defeat the Czech 0-6, 6-4, 6-1 and become the first American woman not named Williams to reach the final of the WTA Finals since 2001.

Stephens, who won all three of her group stage matches, had an alarming start against Pliskova, and admits she was trying to do anything to avoid complete humiliation on the court.


“I was thinking, ‘S***. I made it all the way to the semi-final, and I’m going to lose? Oh, no. It’s, like, this is so embarrassing’. Yeah, that was it, basically. I was, like, ‘I’m going to lose 6-0, 6-0’. It’s like I’m trying so hard. Nothing’s working. But then I won one game. Then you know the rest,” explained Stephens.








“You never know what can happen. Obviously there’s been situations where I’ve been down like 5-2, 4-1, you come back, whatever. But in this situation on this stage, like the semi-final, trying to make the finals, like, my first year-end that I have ever played, there was a lot on the line. I think I just, from the very first match here, I gave it my absolute all, like even the battles to three sets, whatever, I was just going out there and trying to play my butt off.


“That’s what I did today. I didn’t really think about it too much. Yeah, I was bummed that I wasn’t playing well at the beginning, but once I kind of got going, I felt obviously a lot better.”


Stephens had spoken earlier in the week about how she felt that herself, and her fellow bottom four seeds, came to Singapore with a purpose and looking to prove their naysayers wrong. Her latest success, on her WTA Finals debut nonetheless is definitely an effective way of achieving that.


“I think my biggest thing was obviously after the US Open last year, everyone was, like, ‘Oh, she’s a one-hit wonder, she’ll never do anything again, it was just lucky, no one was playing, blah, blah, blah’, and I think this season I was just like I really want to play a little more consistent, I want to have some better results in the bigger tournaments and just do better and show that I’m, you know, I’m a top-10 player or top whatever player,” said Stephens.


“I think I did that throughout the year. Obviously winning Miami, finals of another Grand Slam, finals in Montreal, quarters of the US Open defending a title. Could I have done better? Yeah. Could I have done better in smaller tournaments? Could I have done some things differently, schedule changes, whatever? Yeah, I could have.


“But I think off of not playing tennis for 11 months and having surgery and having to reset my whole life and career and kind of figure out what was really important to me tennis-wise, I think that this year I have done extremely well. I don’t think anyone can say that I had a bad season.”


The 25-year-old American takes a 2-1 head-to-head record lead over Svitolina into their final on Sunday. Svitolina has an impressive 12-2 win-loss record in finals though and has won her last eight title deciders. By virtue of reaching the final, Svitolina will receive the biggest paycheck of her career, scooping $1.2m.



The Ukrainian, who overcame Kiki Bertens 7-5, 6-7(5), 6-4 in a 2hr 38min semi-final on Saturday also explained how the constant critique of her body and results in the second half of the season has been a motivating factor for her to excel in Singapore this week.


“When I qualified for this tournament, definitely decided that I’m going to just go for it and, you know, I’m good enough, I’m going to trust my game, gonna trust myself. And here I am in the final, so it’s something that’s really matters with me and really special moment for me, and I think definitely for the future it’s something that I can be proud of,” added Svitolina.



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