Nick Kyrgios posts emotional message to Andy Murray as tributes pour in after retirement announcement

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • Mail
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • WhatsApp
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn

Nick Kyrgios posted an emotional message to his “old friend” Andy Murray as tributes poured in following the Scot’s retirement announcement on Friday at Melbourne Park.

Murray told reporters that the Australian Open could be his very last tournament, as he continues to suffer from pain in his “severely damaged hip”, although he hopes to be able to bid farewell to the sport at Wimbledon, where he made history for Great Britain by lifting the trophy there in 2013.

Kyrgios, who has always had a close relationship with Murray, took to Instagram to pay tribute to his friend.

“Andy, I know you take me for a joker most of the time, but at least hear me out on this one old friend,” read the message from the Aussie.

“You will always be someone that impacted the sport in so many different ways, I know this was never the way you wanted to go out, but hey it was a heck of a ride. You took me under your wing as soon as I got on tour, and to this day you have been someone I literally just look forward to seeing. You are one crazy tennis player, miles better than me, but I just want you to know that today isn’t only a sad day for you and your team, it’s a sad day for the sport and for everyone you’ve had an impact on.

“Which leaves me big fella.. these are a couple photos, that should make you smile and think, I was actually a little bit of a younger brother to you. Anyways, I just want you to know, and I’m sure you already do, everyone wants you to keep fighting and to keep being you. Good luck at the Australian Open muzz, I’ll be behind you. #onelastdance.”

All the way from Argentina, Juan Martin del Potro, a player who is no stranger to the agony of injury, urged Murray to “keep fighting”.

“Andy, just watched your conference. Please don’t stop trying. Keep fighting. I can imagine your pain and sadness. I hope you can overcome this. You deserve to retire on your own terms, whenever that happens. We love you @andy_murray and we want to see you happy and doing well,” tweeted Del Potro.

Grigor Dimitrov also took to social media to wish Murray well, saying: “Tennis will come to an end for us all but the friendships will last a lifetime. What you’ve done for the sport will live on forever. I’m hoping for a strong and healthy finish for you, my friend!”


View this post on Instagram

Andy, I know you take me for a joker most of the time, but at least hear me out on this one old friend. You will always be someone that impacted the sport in so many different ways, I know this was never the way you wanted to go out, but hey it was a heck of a ride. You took me under your wing as soon as I got on tour, and to this day you have been someone I literally just look forward to seeing. You are one crazy tennis player, miles better than me, but I just want you to know that today isn’t only a sad day for you and your team, it’s a sad day for the sport and for everyone you’ve had an impact on. Which leaves me big fella.. these are a couple photos, that should make you smile and think, I was actually a little bit of a younger brother to you. Anyways, I just want you to know, and I’m sure you already do, everyone wants you to keep fighting and to keep being you. Goodluck at the Australian Open muzz, I’ll be behind you. #onelastdance 🙌🏽🙏🏽

A post shared by Kygs (@k1ngkyrg1os) on


A former world No. 1, three-time Grand Slam champion, Davis Cup winner and Olympic gold medallist, Murray has ticked every box when it comes to accomplishments on the court. But to many, he is most appreciated for the character he was among the tennis community, and his support for the women’s tour and matters like equal pay in sport.

He was a pioneer in many ways, especially when he hired Amelie Mauresmo as his coach – a decision that was met with mixed reaction from his home media. But Murray spoke out when people douted his choice of coach and made sure he called them out on their sexist views.

“@andy_murray You are a champion on and off the court. So sorry you cannot retire on your own terms, but remember to look to the future. Your greatest impact on the world may be yet to come. Your voice for equality will inspire future generations. Much love to you & your family,” tweeted Billie Jean King.


Serena Williams’ coach, Patrick Mouratoglou, who hosted Murray multiple times at his academy in France, described the Brit as “courageous”.

“Of course everyone wants him to keep on playing because of who he is, his personality. He’s one of the only guys that stood up for things that he believed in, most of the time against most of the people, and he had the courage to do that. I think that sticks to his personality, and when we mention Andy Murray, when we look at Andy Murray, that’s what I think when I see him, someone very courageous, someone who had the courage to stand for what he believes in even though most of the people don’t,” Mouratoglou told Sport360.

“And he’s an incredible champion, what he achieved, and he probably played the price of that also because the effort he made to become No. 1 was insane. He was playing almost every week, winning an incredible number of matches, fighting incredibly hard but he finally got what he wanted. At a time when you have the three most dominant champions of all time, so what he achieved is unbelievable.”

Most popular

Andy Murray announces Australian Open could be his last tournament, plans to retire no later than Wimbledon

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • Mail
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • WhatsApp
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn

An emotional Andy Murray broke down during his pre-Australian Open press conference on Friday morning as he announced he’d be retiring from tennis, no later than Wimbledon this year.

The former world No. 1, who had surgery in Melbourne 12 months ago, admits the pain he feels in his hip “is too much” and that the Australian Open – which begins on Monday – could very much be the last tournament of his career.

Murray broke into tears at the start of his press conference and left the room before returning to take questions from the press.

“Not feeling good. Obviously been struggling for a long time. Been in a lot of pain for probably about 20 months now. I’ve pretty much done everything that I could to try and get my hip feeling better and it hasn’t helped loads. I’m in a better place than I was six months ago but still in a lot of pain. It’s been tough,” said the 31-year-old Scot.

Murray plans on playing his Australian Open first round against Roberto Bautista Agut but is unsure about anything beyond that.

“I can still play to a level, not a level that I’m happy playing at but also it’s not just that. The pain is too much really, it’s not something that I want to – I don’t want to continue playing that way,” he explained.

“Like I said, I’ve tried pretty much everything that I could to get right and that hasn’t worked. My plan kind of middle to end of December during my training block, I spoke to my team and I told them I can’t keep doing this. I needed to have like an end point because just playing with no idea when the pain was going to stop and I felt like making that decision, I said to my team, ‘I think I can kind of get through this until Wimbledon, that’s where I’d like to stop playing’, but also I’m not certain I’m able to do that,” Murray added before tearing up again.

Murray concedes that “there’s a chance” that Melbourne would be his last tournament as he feels unsure he could withstand playing through the pain for another five months until Wimbledon, where he has triumphed twice, ending Great Britain’s 77-year men’s singles title drought at the event.

The three-time major champion is considering having another surgery to resurface his hip but he would not be doing it with the intention to return to professional tennis.

“It will allow me to have a better quality of life and be out of pain and that’s something I’m seriously considering right now. Some athletes have had that and gone back to competing but there’s obviously no guarantees with that. The reason for having an operation like that is not to return to professional sport, it’s for a better quality of life,” said Murray.

“For myself mainly. There’s lots of little things that, obviously you guys see me running around the tennis court and walking between points and I know it doesn’t look good and it doesn’t look good and it doesn’t look comfortable but there’s little things like day to day that are also a struggle. It would e nice to be able to do them without any pain. Putting shoes on, socks on, things like that. So that’s the main reason for doing it.

Murray has been dealing with hip pain for many years but says his French Open semifinal against Stan Wawrinka in 2017 “pushed it over the edge”.

“It just got to a level where I didn’t recover from that match,” he says.

“And having the operation was hopefully to make it as good as possible and it didn’t help with the pain at all and that’s the thing I’ve been struggling with, the walking and the certain things on the court that I can’t really do properly now, but the pain is the driving factor because I can play with limitations, that’s not an issue, it’s having the limitations and then also the pain is not allowing me to enjoy competing or training or any of the stuff that I love about tennis.”

The Brit admits the whole process of dealing with his injury has been draining, adding: “I’ve talked a lot, way too much about my hip for 18 months pretty much, it’s a daily thing, and it’s not just people that I work with that ask me, it’s everyone. Everyone that I bump into, that’s all I talk about, it’s pretty draining.

“I’ve spoken, not loads but a number of times to psychologists and stuff about it but nothing helps because you’re in lots and lots of pain. You can’t do what it is that you want to do, you love doing. I can do it, it’s just not fun, not enjoyable doing it anymore. That’s kind of what I’ve done, tried to deal with it, talked about it, but none of that makes my hip feel better unfortunately, I wish it did, I’d be feeling brilliant just now, but it doesn’t so…”

Most popular

Related Tags

Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal land in same half, Andy Murray handed tricky opener - Aus Open talking points

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • Mail
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • WhatsApp
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn

The Australian Open draw was revealed on Thursday evening in Melbourne ahead Monday’s tournament kick-off date and it saw Roger Federer land in the same half as Rafael Nadal.

World No. 1 and six-time champion Novak Djokovic shares a half of the draw with the player who defeated him in the final of the ATP Finals last November, Alexander Zverev, and floaters like Andy Murray, Nick Kyrgios, Stan Wawrinka were all handed tricky openers.

Here are the main talking points surrounding the men’s Australian Open draw.

EARLY TESTS FOR DJOKOVIC

The top seed is gunning for a record-extending seventh Australian Open crown this upcoming fortnight but has some potential early landmines in his path with 2008 finalist Jo-Wilfried Tsonga – returning from an injury break and showed decent form in Brisbane – a second-round candidate for the Serb, and talented teen Denis Shapovalov a possible third round opponent.

Djokovic also has both Brisbane finalists in his quarter, with in-form 15th-seeded Daniil Medvedev possibly awaiting in the fourth round and eighth-seeded Kei Nishikori a potential quarter-final rival.

OPPORTUNITY FOR FEDERER

Two-time defending champion Federer has a relatively manageable draw, with two of the three players he defeated in Hopman Cup last week – Stefanos Tsitsipas and Cameron Norrie – landing his quarter. The likes of Karen Khachanov and Marin Cilic could face the Swiss in the last-eight and he opens against Uzbekistan’s Denis Istomin.

TOUGH LUCK FOR THE FLOATERS

Unseeded floaters like Murray, Kyrgios and Wawrinka were always going to be a major question mark entering this draw and they all received tricky paths. Murray, who is still on his way back from hip surgery, opens against Doha champion Roberto Bautista Agut, who defeated Djokovic last week on his way to his title triumph in Qatar.

Home favourite Kyrgios, who is down to 51 in the world, drew fellow big-server Milos Raonic in round one, while Wawrinka takes on erratic Lativan Ernests Gulbis in his first match.

ZVEREV’S NEXT GEN TASK

If ever there was a time for Zverev to best his fellow youngsters at a major, this would be it. The 21-year-old German has been at the forefront of the Next Gen crew for the past couple of seasons and solidified his position as the leader of the group when he won the ATP Finals last November. But as much as he has proven himself on the ATP tour, Zverev only has one Grand Slam quarter-final to his name, which has led people to question his abilities in the best-of-five format. His draw in Melbourne grouped him with several players from his generation like Chung Hyeon – semi-finalist in Melbourne last year who defeated Zverev along the way – Borna Coric, and seventh-seeded Dominic Thiem, who is four years older but is still considered part of that up-and-coming group of stars.

FIRST ROUNDS TO WATCH

Bernard Tomic v Marin Cilic

Roberto Bautista Agut v Murray

Gael Monfils v Damir Dzumhur

Kyle Edmund v Tomas Berdych

Ernests Gulbis v Stan Wawrinka

Milos Raonic v Nick Kyrgios

Dominic Thiem v Benoit Paire

PROJECTED QUARTER-FINALS BY SEED

Top half:

Novak Djokovic (SRB x1) v Kei Nishikori (JPN x8)

Alexander Zverev (GER x4) v Dominic Thiem (AUT x7)

Bottom half:

Roger Federer (SUI x3) v Marin Cilic (CRO x6)

Kevin Anderson (RSA x5) v Rafael Nadal (ESP x2)

Most popular