On This Day: Venus seals a third Wimbledon title

Chrisa 3/07/2016
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Delight: Venus Williams after her 2005 triumph.

The women’s singles final of Wimbledon in 2005 required two hours and 45 minutes for completion, at the end of which Venus Williams earned her third title on the famed grass courts.

To accomplish the feat, Williams had to overcome her longtime rival Lindsay Davenport 4-6, 7-6 (4), 9-7 in an epic three-set clash.

After dethroning defending Wimbledon champion Maria Sharapova in the semi-final, Williams was pushed to the max by Davenport, who had match point in the 10th game of the final set.

Williams, however, never allowed Davenport to get as close again as she battled back to win her fifth major of her career.

The match is regarded as one of the finest finals in the open era.

Other notable moments:

1931: Max Schmeling TKOs young Stribling in 15 rounds for the heavyweight title.
1959: Gary Players win the 88th edi- tion of The Open Championship with a score of 284 at Muirfield Gullane.
1994: Romania eliminates Argentina from the FIFA World Cup with a 3-2 victory.
2006: NHl legend Steve yzerman announces his retirement.

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Kvitova suffers Wimbledon second round defeat

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Heading for the exit: Kvitova.

Petra Kvitova’s schedule from hell ended in defeat with the Czech No. 10 seed falling to Russia’s Ekaterina Makarova 7-5, 7-6(5) in a second round that was bizarrely concluded on Saturday – the sixth day of the tournament following extensive delays.

In a match that should have been played on Thursday but was postponed twice due to the rain, Kvitova suffered her earliest Wimbledon exit since 2009.

The clash between the two- time Wimbledon champion and Makarova was the last second round to be concluded in the tournament and Kvitova admits it was a strange situation.

“It’s very weird, I have to say. I felt like I was stuck in the second round for a while,” said Kvitova.

“Yeah, I think that the tournament was really, like, weird for me this time. I couldn’t really describe how. But I was waiting all day long almost every day to be scheduled on, and didn’t really have a chance to finish or step on the court. So it was really weird.”

Players like Venus Williams and Carla Suarez Navarro had already booked places in the fourth round on Friday while Kvitova and Makarova still had to play their second round on Saturday.

“We were having a laugh at it. What we can do, right, in the locker room. It is how it is. I wish my matches had been scheduled a little bit better, but it’s the past now,” said Kvitova.

No. 3 seed Agnieszka Radwanska moved into the fourth round with a 6-3, 6-1 win over Katerina Siniakova to set up a showdown with 19th-seeded Dominika Cibulkova, who dismissed 2014 runner-up Eugenie Bouchard 6-4, 6-3, to take her match-winning streak on grass to eight matches.

Fifth-seeded Simona Halep and ninth-seeded Madison Keys set up a mouth-watering last-16 clash against one another with victories over Kiki Bertens and Alize Cornet respectively.

“I’m really happy that I won this match,” said Halep, a semi-finalist at Wimbledon in 2014.

“It was important for me. It was a big challenge. I knew she’s in good form and she is playing good tennis at the moment.

“She did a great job at the French Open, so she had a lot of confidence before this match.”

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Reem’s Wimbledon Diary: Sold-out People's Sunday, fine list

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Wimbledon is set for its first Middle Sunday since 2004.

For the first time since 2004 and just the fourth time in the tournament’s 139-year history, there will be matches played at Wimbledon on Middle Sunday – now dubbed the People’s Sunday.

Middle Sunday is a sacred tradition here at the All England Club, and I must say us journalists, along with the Wimbledon staff, players and others involved, really appreciate it as it provides a much-needed break in a brutal two-week stretch.

Wimbledon is the only slam that has an off day in the middle and every year it comes around, we wish the other majors adopted it.

For spectators however, this is a golden chance to attend the most iconic tennis tournament in the world, with tickets released online on Saturday specifically for Middle Sunday.

110,000 people were in the online queue for the 28,000 tickets that were released and sold out in 27 minutes.

A woman named Alison, who lives in the United States, said on Twitter that she managed to purchase a ticket and will get on a plane and fly to London to catch some live tennis at Wimbledon.

With stories like that, who cares if I get a day’s rest? People’s Sunday will surely be a huge hit.

Meanwhile, the list of code violations and corresponding fines given out to players was put up on the wall at the press centre and it came as quite a surprise that Heather Watson topped that list with a hefty $12,000 fine for “unsportsmanlike conduct” during her first round defeat to Annika Beck.

Watson had an episode in the third set, tossing her racket into the turf, and jamming it down a couple more times when she went to her seat, which is apparently what earned her that fine. But many find it surprising that her racquet abuse – against the holy Wimbledon grass – warranted a bigger fine than the now-viral meltdown Viktor Troicki had, when he growled at umpire Damiano Torella.

Here’s a look at the fines leader board here at the All England Club so far this fortnight:

Wimbledon-Fines

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