Danny Welbeck believes nothing can bore him at World Cup after Arsenal injury lay-off

Simon Peach 11/06/2018
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • Mail
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • WhatsApp
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn

Danny Welbeck spent enough time cooped up through injury that talk of boredom setting in at England’s remote World Cup base is immediately laughed off.

The Three Lions head to Russia on Tuesday as the next phase of World Cup preparations gets under way at their team base in Repino.

Around 45 minutes away from the nearest city of St Petersburg, there have been questions about the suitability of the quiet area for players during the World Cup.

England’s much-maligned Rustenberg base in 2010 has been mentioned in the same breath, but Gareth Southgate gave short shrift to talk of boredom calling it “sad, nonsense and a big red herring”.

Welbeck echoed the England manager’s sentiments ahead of the team heading east, with injury problems of recent years giving him a philosophical outlook.

“For me, nothing like that seems to bother me,” he told Press Association Sport with a laugh.

“I’ve had surgery and then not been allowed to put weight on my leg for two months, so I’ve been stuck in a room and that sort of stuff.

“I don’t get bored now. I’ve been through that, I don’t get bored.

“I know what I can do to occupy myself, occupy my brain.

“If I am on my own, I like my own company (laughs) after that, so I am cool. That sort of stuff won’t really bother me.”

Welbeck’s approach is shaped by the eight-month injury lay-off that saw him miss Euro 2016 and has disrupted his time at Arsenal, where he has had a couple of niggling issues since recovering from that knee complaint.

“Obviously as soon as you have the injury, you’re not in a happy place at all,” the 27-year-old said.

“You know once you’ve had the surgery, you’re going to be out for a certain period of time.

“It’s frustrating.

“I missed the last Euros and you miss however many months of the Premier League season and that’s the one thing you want to do as a footballer – you want to be playing football on the football pitch and enjoying playing the game that you love.

“When you get an injury, that takes it away from you but there’s things that you can do to try and take it in a positive way however hard it may be.

“With it being an injury, it is so negative, but you try and get the positives out of it, see what you can do to learn from the game.

“You might not be able to play but you still learn mentally and that sort of thing, so I think you’ve just got to try and find that positive.

“At the end of the day, you’ve still got that hunger and desire to get back out on the pitch and that’s what will drive you on.”

Welbeck did enough on his return to earn a place in his third major tournament squad with England, although the road to full fitness has had bumps along the way.

“When you come back from an injury, you don’t just go ‘bang’ straight back into things,” he said.

“You have to get into the repetition of playing games, of training consistently and getting more robust because you’ve been out for a long time and you go straight back in at the top end of football.

“It’s hard, you feel it on your body, but you’ve just got to keep on sticking at it, make sure you can do whatever you can to feel as best as you can.

“You just keep ticking away and just keep on trying to improve.”

Welbeck came off the bench last Thursday to wrap up England’s 2-0 friendly win against Costa Rica and is now looking to help make amends for the World Cup four years ago.

“It makes you hungry, but I don’t think you need the extra motivation going into a World Cup,” the forward, one of the five survivors from the 2014 squad, said.

“I think it’s important not to dwell on the past.

“Obviously we know that wasn’t good enough and since then the team, the squad, has come on such a long way.

“We look forward to it with hope and optimism and focus on the World Cup positively.”

Most popular

England warned about 'devastating consequences' of tick bites in Russia near World Cup base

Simon Peach 10/06/2018
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • Mail
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • WhatsApp
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn

England’s players have been warned about the “truly devastating consequences” of tick-borne encephalitis given its prevalence in the area around their World Cup base.

Gareth Southgate’s men jet off to Russia on Tuesday for this summer’s tournament, where they will be based at the forRestMix Club in Repino on the outskirts of St Petersburg.

However, the remote area Harry Kane and Co will call home during the World Cup comes with a health risk, as do some of the places England fans may visit.

Russia has the highest number of reported TBE cases globally and Repino is considered a moderately high zone of a virus the Encephalitis Society calls a “serious health concern”.

Ava Easton, chief executive of The Encephalitis Society, said in a statement to Press Association Sport: “football fans will likely be travelling to sites in Russia where there is a risk of TBE, such as areas like Repino where the England team will be based, and in Nizhny Novgorod for their second game, where the risk is even higher than in Repino.

“It is recommended that anyone planning to spend time outdoors in these TBE endemic European countries speak to their healthcare professional and take measures to help protect themselves from this disease, which can have truly devastating consequences.”

Easton says the risk of TBE is increased for those undergoing outdoor activities in forested or grassy areas, with an infected bite potentially resulting “in a severe illness”.

The NHS say “the risk of getting seriously ill is low” even if bitten, but the viral infection that attacks the central nervous system can cause encephalitis, meningitis or inflammation of the tissues that surround the brain or spinal cord.

Long-term complications include convulsions and paralysis, with the most severe cases leading to death.

The annual number of TBE cases in Russia that are severe enough to require hospitalisation ranges from 5,500 to 10,000.

Press Association Sport understands the Football Association will be taking all necessary precautions during England’s stay in Russia.

Advice on the German Football Association website to fans said getting a TBE vaccination was “important”.

Provided by Press Association Sportย  ย  ย  ย ย 

Most popular

Liverpool star Mohamed Salah confident of facing Uruguay after 'worst moment' of career

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • Mail
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • WhatsApp
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn

Mohamed Salah admitted his injury in the Champions League final was his โ€˜worst momentโ€™ in football so far โ€“ but is confident of lining up in Egyptโ€™s World Cup opener against Uruguay.

Sergio Ramos tangled with Salah in the first half of the final in Kiev two weeks ago, resulting in the Liverpool superstar leaving the pitch in tears and then the stadium with his arm in a sling.

It led to defeat for Liverpool, an outcry in Egypt and a race against time for the forward who was set to be one of the stars of the summer in Russia.

However, Salah was only too happy to reveal the good news in an interview with Marca that he has a good chance of seeing the field against Uruguay on June 15.

Asked if the injury was the worst moment of his career, Salah replied: “Yes, it was.

“When I fell to the ground, I had a mixture of physical pain and a lot of worry. Also anger and sadness for not being able to continue playing the Champions League final.

โ€œMoments later, I also thought about the possibility of not playing in the World Cup and that was a devastating thought.

“Now I’m better. I hope to play the first game against Uruguay, but that will depend on how I feel when it approaches.”

Most popular