Watch highlights of the final day at Wimbledon as Novak Djokovic defeats Roger Federer

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Novak Djokovic battled past Roger Federer in a thrilling Wimbledon final that lasted just shy of five hours on Sunday.

The top seed became the first player to win a singles match on a deciding tie-break with the pair locked at 12-games all in the fifth set.

Federer had earlier served for victory at 8-7 in the deciding set but Djokovic saved two championship points to remain in the hunt for his fifth Wimbledon crown.

A mis-hit forehand sealed 37-year-old Federer’s fate and denied him the chance to become the oldest man in the Open Era to win a Grand Slam title.


Djokovic has now won four out of the last five Grand Slam tournaments, taking his overall tally to 16 as he edges ever closer to Federer’s record of 20.









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Wimbledon win over Roger Federer is Novak Djokovic's most mentally demanding match of career

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Novak Djokovic described his epic Wimbledon final victory over Roger Federer as the most mentally demanding match of his career.

The defending champion saved two match points in the fifth set before winning the first deciding tie-break played in singles at the All England Club for a 7-6 (5), 1-6, 7-6 (4), 4-6, 13-12 (3) victory after four hours and 57 minutes.

It was the longest men’s singles final in Wimbledon history and brought Djokovic a fifth title, equalling Bjorn Borg and now just three behind Federer.

The Serbian is closing in on Federer’s all-time grand-slam record, too, with his 16th title leaving him four off the Swiss and only two adrift of Rafael Nadal.

“It was a huge relief in the end, honestly,” said Djokovic, who once again proved himself the master at winning the points that matter.

“These kind of matches, you work for, you live for, they give sense and they give value to every minute you spend on the court training and working to get yourself in this position and play the match with one of your greatest rivals of all time.

“It was probably the mentally most demanding match I was ever part of. I had the most physically demanding match against Nadal in the finals of Australia that went almost six hours. But mentally this was a different level, because of everything.

“I’m just obviously thrilled and overjoyed with emotions to be sitting here in front of you as a winner. It was one shot away from losing the match. This match had everything. It could have gone easily his way.

“In these kind of moments, I just try to never lose self-belief, just stay calm, just focus on trying to get the ball back, return, which wasn’t serving me very well today. But, in the most important moments, all three tie-breaks I guess, I found my best game.”

It was an extraordinary contest. The sustained quality was not the same as Federer’s final loss to Rafael Nadal in 2008, which this match passed as the longest title decider, but it had more plot twists than a feature-length thriller.

Federer, who won 15 more points in the match, was the better player for all of the first four sets, with Djokovic’s game strangely off colour apart from his serve, but played two poor tie-breaks either side of a set that his opponent barely turned up for.

Djokovic’s level dropped again in the fourth and, when it looked like he was finally taking control early in the fifth with a break of serve to lead 4-2, he was promptly broken back.

Federer seemed to be under more pressure but it was he who broke to lead 8-7 and at 40-15 he held two match points.

The crowd, who had been chanting Federer’s name throughout, thought this was the moment but the 37-year-old netted a forehand and then was passed at the net as Djokovic broke back.

Federer had two more chances to break at 11-11 but again could not take them and his nemesis on the day, the tie-break, came back to haunt him once again.

The deciding tie-break was introduced following last year’s long semi-final between Kevin Anderson and John Isner and had not been needed at all during the singles tournament until this match.

Djokovic got irked by the crowd’s support for opponent Roberto Bautista Agut in the semi-finals but here remained pointedly calm, the only flash of anger coming when he swiped at a chair with his racket late in the fifth set.

“When the crowd is chanting ‘Roger’ I hear ‘Novak’,” he said. “It sounds silly, but it is like that. I try to convince myself.”

After beating his other great rival Nadal in the semi-finals, this was agonisingly close to the perfect tournament for Federer, who turns 38 next month and may never get a better chance to win a 21st slam title.

It was his third final defeat here by Djokovic in six years after losses in 2014 and 2015, while the match brought flashbacks of two semi-finals between the pair at the US Open, the Serbian saving two match points on each occasion.

Federer was left kicking himself at the chances he could not take, saying: “I don’t know what I feel right now. I just feel like it’s such an incredible opportunity missed. I can’t believe it.”

He held himself together admirably at the end and, although clearly stung, he insisted he would not dwell on it for too long.

He said: “Similar to getting broken when serving for the match: take it on your chin, you move on. You try to forget, try to take the good things out of this match. There’s just tons of it.

“Similar to ’08 maybe, I will look back at it and think, ‘Well, it’s not that bad after all’. For now it hurts, and it should, like every loss does here at Wimbledon.

“I think it’s a mindset. I’m very strong at being able to move on because I don’t want to be depressed about actually an amazing tennis match.”

After the men’s match on Cente Court, Su-Wei Hsieh and Barbora Strycova beat Gabriela Dabrowski and Yifan Xu 6-2, 6-4 in the women’s doubles final.

Earlier in the day on No1 Court, Ivan Dodig and Latisha Chan defeated Robert Lindstedt and Jelena Ostapenko 6-2, 6-3 in the mixed doubles, while Japan’s Shintaro Mochizuki won the boys’ singles final.

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Painful French Open defeat set Simona Halep on path to Wimbledon glory

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Simona Halep revealed how a painful loss at the French Open set her on the path to Wimbledon glory.

The 27-year-old produced one of the great final performances at the All England Club, committing just three unforced errors in a 6-2, 6-2 victory over Serena Williams that she described as the best match of her life.

Halep is at her most comfortable on clay and won her first grand slam title last summer in her third French Open final, but her defence of that crown ended with a 6-2, 6-4 loss to 17-year-old Amanda Anisimova in the quarter-finals.

“The biggest adjustment is the way I played,” said Halep. “In the French Open, in the quarter-finals, I played very bad. I was disappointed and I didn’t manage how to be aggressive in that match.

“So then I started to work on this direction, I’ve been more aggressive and here I didn’t fall back at all. It hurt me that loss. I got motivated straight away to be better here.”

As well as her current coach, fellow Romanian Daniel Dobre, Halep also used her on-court interview to thank her mentor, Darren Cahill.

The Australian was Halep’s full-time coach until he announced at the end of last season that he was taking a break to spend more time with his family, but he remains a very important figure in her life.

Halep credits an on-court coaching visit from Cahill at the Miami Open in 2017 for setting her on the right path.

Cahill was so unhappy with Halep’s negative attitude that he stopped working with her for two months. They were reunited ahead of that year’s French Open, where she went on to reach her second slam final.

“He has taught me how to manage my emotions, how to be a better person on court,” said Halep.

“He gave me advice to trust myself as a player on court and being able to face everyone and to beat everyone. If you hear some things like this from a person that you trust and is the best coach in the world, then you are more confident and you can go on to make them happen.

“He’s a very special person and because of him I was also able to win here. We started to work this change. As I told him, I needed time for it to sink in and to be able to feel it.”

Halep’s most treasured prize appeared not to be the trophy but the purple badge that signified she is now a member of the All England Club and can return for a visit whenever she likes.

There are no grass courts in Romania, where the French Open is the most popular slam, but Halep’s mother Tania told her when she was a child that the final she needed to reach was Wimbledon.

“She has no idea about tennis so definitely not the way of playing or stuff like that,” said Halep when asked why SW19 had been so important to her mother.

“Maybe the fact that you play in front of the Royal Box, the Royal family, made her feel special. That’s why she told me it’s going to be the most awesome and beautiful thing to play a final. She didn’t say to win it. Now I made it more special.”

The Duchess of Cambridge, who Halep had identified as the person she most wanted to be in the Royal Box on Saturday, and Williams’ close friend the Duchess of Sussex were among the spectators wowed by the new champion’s performance.

But it is not just the Royal presence that makes Halep so enamoured with her new club.

“All the flowers – I love flowers,” she said. “The colours, the people, they are very well dressed. The elegance of everywhere you go. The courts, the rules that you have to be white when you play. The champion’s balcony, it’s pretty awesome.

“Everything makes this tournament very special. I never thought I would be able to win on grass. So when I did it, it makes it huge.”

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